The Source for Media Coverage of The Arts in Miami.
Articles, reviews, previews and features on dance and music performances and events.
Sign Up
No one logged in. Log in

Consider the idea of land in Palestine, and conflict may be the first thing to come to mind. But for Jumana Emil Abboud, the Palestinian landscape evokes other, older, associations – with mythological creatures like water spirits and ghouls. “These stories were told way before 1948,” says the Galilee-born artist, speaking by phone from her home in Jerusalem. She suggests looking back ..

Steven Levenson’s “If I Forget” began its Off-Broadway run a year ago, closing just six weeks before the now 33-year-old playwright won the Tony Award for writing the book of the acclaimed musical “Dear Evan Hansen.” Cut to February 2018, and South Florida already has its own exquisite production of “If I Forget,” thanks to GableStage artistic director Joseph Adler. Levenson’s fun..

In a career that continues to soar two decades after his first play was produced, Michael McKeever has premiered his dramas, comedies and short plays at theaters all over South Florida. Nearly always, he’s involved in those productions as the author, sometimes as an actor, at times as a set designer. The plays get their start here, then go on to productions (sometimes multiple product..

When M. John Richard decided to leave the New Jersey Performing Arts Center in late 2008 to become president and chief executive officer of Miami’s Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, he arrived in South Florida with a vision, myriad ideas and a long-term exit strategy. “I knew in 2008 that I had a 10-year run in my tank,” says Richard, 65, who plans to retire from his Arsh..

Friendships can bring seemingly unlike people together to sometime form a strong bond. Such is the case in Walter Dean Myers’ coming of age novel, Darius & Twig. According to the summary notes of the book “Two best friends, a writer and a runner, deal with bullies, family issues, social pressures, and their quest for success coming out of Harlem.” It’s a tale of endurance, perseverance, an..

Kristoffer Diaz’s searing, hilarious and all-too-resonant play “The Elaborate Entrance of Chad Deity” isn’t new to South Florida. The 2009 script, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, made its area debut in 2012 in a fierce and fine production at Boca Raton’s Caldwell Theatre Company just a few months before the long-running regional powerhouse folded. Now “Chad Deity” has ret..

“This is no camera, nothing cut. This is real," says Tranee Wallace, whose story is one of three live radio plays in Dan Froot and Company's "Pang!" at Miami Light Project's Light Box at the Goldman Warehouse. Hers is one of a triptych of oral histories adapted into plays of families facing adversity: A Los Angeles single mom who loses the home she and her nine children live in after..

When it comes to farces, Michael Frayn’s “Noises Off” is one of the great ones. The 1982 comedy has made it to Broadway three times, and American audiences all over the country have embraced it in countless regional productions. Actors’ Playhouse is having a go at “Noises Off” as the second show of its 30th anniversary season. The play fits like a period glove on the main stage at the..

The intricate alchemy of inspired theatrical art is on full display in Zoetic Stage’s darkly hilarious, gripping world premiere of Christopher Demos-Brown’s “Wrongful Death and Other Circus Acts.” Demos-Brown, a rising theatrical star whose play “American Son” will open on Broadway in November, has drawn on his experience as a lawyer working on wrongful death cases to create a savage exami..

My Barbarian wanted to take Miami on a boat ride. “We wanted to interact and be out in the public,” Alex Segade reveals over the phone from Los Angeles, where he just got out of rehearsal for My Barbarian’s first Miami show, coming up this Saturday at the Miami Light Project, as part of Miami-Dade College’s Museum of Art and Design’s “Living Together” performance series this season. ..

When the Alvin Ailey Dance Theater returns to town this week, Miami native son Jamar Roberts will take center stage. As one of the company’s star dancers, he has long shined as a performer. B..

He says his dance comes from his dreams. French-Algerian choreographer Hervé Koubi’s most recent work, “What the Day Owes the Night” combines Sufi rhythms with cutting edge b-boy moves, class..

A world premiere always comes with a drum roll. And, throughout the years, Miami City Ballet has brought to light its fair share of resounding new works. Still, Brian Brooks’ freshly-minted O..

Wednesday night at the Arsht Center’s Knight Concert Hall the South Florida Symphony Orchestra in collaboration with the Martha Graham Dance company presented “Appalachian Spring Suite” and “The R..

Cooking may be Dan Froot’s favorite thing. This is saying a lot since Froot is also a composer, a dancer, a sax-player, a play-wright, an oral-historian -- an all-around performance artist an..

With the closing of Tigertail Productions last year, Miami lost one of its preeminent artistic champions. Under the direction of founder Mary Luft, Tigertail brought an endless parade of boundary-..

Anytime would be a good time to devote a dance program to the works of Jerome Robbins, our most versatile and celebrated American-born choreographer. But, given that 2018 marks the centennial..

Due to winter storms in the Northeast impacting travel, with great regrets the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company announced the cancellation of the Saturday, Jan. 6 performance. At age..

It is fitting at this time of the year that our thoughts often turn to what connects us not what divides us. Whether we are driven by religious or secular motives, many of us are in the spiri..

In the music of Las Cafeteras and Orkesta Mendoza, presented by Fundarte at the South Miami-Dade Cultural Arts Center Saturday, the border is no place for walls but rather, a moveable feast. ..

Performance Hall at New World Center was packed Saturday, Feb. 3 for the New Work program, which NWS conductor and artistic director Michael Tilson Thomas introduced as “one of the more adve..

Having grown up in Buenos Aires with a strong interest in music, one would think that Jaime Bronsztein (http://jaimebronsztein.webs.com/) would have slid down the well-lubricated tracks towar..

A creepy old king ogles his beautiful stepdaughter. Powerless to stop him, her mother, the queen, protests drunkenly. The girl, age maybe 12 or so, falls for the only man who does not lust af..

At first their sound is reminiscent of Bob Marley. Just as plaintive but with added punch. But listen longer -- the more familiar the music feels, the harder it is to pin down. This is t..

People often imagine new artwork is the product of the solitary artist genius slaving away in lonely studios. The South Florida Symphony’s 20th anniversary program foregrounds a different vis..

At an age when many are winding down their working lives, Ignacio Berroa eagerly anticipates a new stage in his career. It would be understandable if the 64-year-old drummer, recognized a..

We know it’s the holiday season when trees light up, menorah candles start to burn, ubiquitous Christmas carols pipe through drugstores, “The Nutcracker” plays on every stage – and in recent ..

Late last year, on Dec. 20, 2016, Romero Britto and Mark Bryn hosted the Great Artists Series Cocktail Reception at the Britto Fine Art Gallery to celebrate the legendary impresaria, Judy Dru..

Omar Sosa: Festival Internacional de Jazz de Miami

Photo:
Written by: Fernando Gonzalez
Article Rating

 

Para el pianista y compositor cubano Omar Sosa la noción de una cultura global, sin fronteras, no es un concepto abstracto sino un tema personal. En su música, elementos de hip hop y rumba, ritmos de los Gnawa de Marruecos, un blues y cantos de la música ritual de los Orishas (o Santería), conviven, se mezclan y se potencian de una manera natural y sorprendente.

Para Sosa, son simplemente diferentes expresiones de una misma raíz africana.
“Somos todos hijos de la misma madre,” escribió Sosa en sus notas para su disco Afreecanos (2008). “Y aunque nuestros sonidos son diferentes por la geografía, todos estamos cerca en esencia, concepto y raíz.”

Su trío con el trompetista italiano Paolo Fresu y el percusionista indio Trilok Gurtu sugueren una fascinante vuelta de tuerca a esas ideas, vuelta que no solo las reafirma sino que las expande.

Gurtu, Fresu y Sosa, en su primera gira por los Estados Unidos, actúan con el Dillard Center for the Arts Jazz Ensemble, cerrando el 4to Festival Internacional de Jazz de Miami en el Wertheim Performing Arts Center de la Escuela de Música de FIU el próximo sábado (abril29) a las 8 p.m. (Para ver el programa completo del festival visite www.miamiinternationaljazzfest.org )

Sosa, 52, nació en Camagüey y después de terminar sus estudios en la Escuela Nacional de Música y el Instituto Superior de Arte de La Habana salió de gira con su primer grupo, visitando Angola, Congo, Etiopía y Nicaragua. En 1993 se mudó a Quito, Ecuador y de allí a la llamada Bay Area en California, primero en San Francisco y luego en Oakland, antes de asentarse en Barcelona, España, en 1999. Fue durante su estancia en Ecuador, trabajando con músicos y cantantes afro-ecuatorianos de la región costeña de Esmeralda, donde Sosa se encontró con muchas, y profundas, similitudes con la cultura afro-cubana.

El descubrimiento lo inspiró a investigar y explorar los lazos entre las culturas de la diáspora africana. “En Cuba siempre tienes la historia de la negritud alrededor, pero la tienes tan cerca que no la aprecias,” dijo Sosa en una entrevista en una previa visita a Miami. En esa búsqueda, plasmada ya en más de 25 álbumes, Sosa ha utilizado todo tipo de ensambles e instrumentaciones — incluyendo dúos, tríos y cuartetos, pero también big bands de jazz y orquestas sinfónicas, mezclando desde tambores batá, clarinetes y computadoras a percusión afro-venezolana e instrumentos como el n’goni (un laúd de África Occidental).

Sosa habló desde Rennes, Francia, donde estaba preparando un concierto con la Orchestre National de Bretagne.

Tú has usado todo tipo de formatos musicales, desde dúos de piano y percusión y cuartetos de jazz a orquestas sinfónicas. ¿Cómo surge este trío?

El proyecto originalmente era con Trilok Gurtu y [el percusionista brasileño] Airto Moreira, dos músicos extraordinarios, pero hubo problemas de calendario con Airto y como alternativa, en vez de buscar otro percusionista, le propuse a Trilok incluir un instrumento melódico. Trilok para mí es un referente. En la escuela en La Habana estudié percusión, soy percusionista, y tocar con Trilok es como cenar la mejor comida con el mejor vino (se ríe). Él fue uno de los primeros que entró en lo que hoy se llama World Jazz. Y su universo [musical] es tan personal y a la vez tan universal que de pronto está tocando India y se te va a África.

Yo no conozco a nadie que sepa más sobre la música africana que Trilok. Pero para el trío, de cara a la mezcla de culturas y al lirismo que podíamos darle a la música, agregar un instrumento melódico me parecía mucho más interesante [que buscar otro percusionista]. Paolo y yo venimos tocando juntos hace años, tenemos ya dos discos como dúo [Alma, 2012 y Eros, 2016] y nos llevamos de maravillas. El es de Cerdeña, es un isleño, como yo, y el estar rodeado de mar te impregna de algo especial, no creas, y eso también nos une. Nosotros en Cuba tenemos mucha África, pero en Cerdeña también tienen mucha África, y en el mundo vocal, ellos tienen cosas que se asemejan a las tradiciones campesinas nuestras, como el punto guajiro.

Cada formato requiere una manera diferente de tocar, de presentar la música. ¿Cómo ha afectado tu estilo el ser parte de este trío,?

Desde la grabación de Mulatos mi productor Steve Arguelles me viene diciendo “No es necesario sacar músculo todo el tiempo. Hay muchas maneras de llegarle a la gente”. Y eso es algo que nosotros los cubanos y los latinos no siempre tenemos en cuenta. Poco a poco he estado buscando ese camino de tocar “canciones sin palabras,” de aprender a dejar espacio, de tocar menos. Es la filosofía de Miles [Davis] quien decía que, a veces, la mejor nota es la que no tocas. Es el arte de encontrar la magia en el silencio, y eso con Paolo se da muy fácil.

Todo en tu música, desde la composición y los arreglos a la instrumentación y la interpretación, habla de un mundo sin fronteras, de conexiones, de encuentros, justo en un momento en que inmigración es un tema caliente, y doloroso, en Europa y aquí en los Estados Unidos. ¿Cuál es tu perspectiva?

Hace 3 días tocamos en Calais, Francia, en un centro cultural guapísimo, con el proyecto Transparent Water (Agua Transparente) con el músico y cantante senegalés Seckou Keita. Había un frio de pelar, pero había una instalación de cuatro chicos que estaban subidos en el quinto piso del edificio con unos carteles enormes que decían: “Aunque cierren las fronteras nunca impedirán que la gente viaje y que la gente se encuentre.” Y así es. Aunque los políticos quieran cerrar puertas por un problema de poder y de estrategia económica, eso ya no se puede parar, porque si la gente no viaja físicamente, viaja cibernéticamente. La humanidad es mezcla.

Si Va

Quien: El trio Trilok Gurto, Paolo Fresu y Omar Sosa, parte del 4to Festival Internacional de Jazz de Miami.

Cuando: Sabado, abril 29, 2017 a las 8:00 p.m.

Donde: Wertheim Performing Arts Center, FIU’s School of Music,

10910 SW 17th St,Miami

Tickets: $20 - $25 a la venta en www.miamiinternationaljazzfest.org

Para más información llamar305-491-3588.

 


 



Deja un comentario ...
Debe estar registrado
No one logged in. Log in
Deja un comentario ...
Was this helpful?
No Very

Captcha Image

Acerca del autor

Music writer, associate editor of the Latin GRAMMY Print & Special Projects for The Latin Recording Academy

Emmy-winner and GRAMMY®-nominated writer, critic, and editor Fernando González is the associate editor of The Latin GRAMMY Print & ..

About the Writer