The Source for Media Coverage of The Arts in Miami.
Articles, reviews, previews and features on dance and music performances and events.
Sign Up
No one logged in. Log in

Artburst Portal

“Carousel,” which contains some of the most gorgeous and memorable songs ever written for a musical, may be a musical you’ve never seen, though it has been around since 1945. The follow-up to “Oklahoma!,” Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II’s hugely successful debut as a composer-lyricist team, “Carousel” requires a huge cast by today’s standards, an orchestra that can do that gl..

Before women like movie star Melissa McCarthy, Chrissy Metz of NBC’s “This Is Us” and Whitney Thore of TLC’s “My Big Fat Fabulous Life” became widely embraced personalities, Josefina Lopez wrote a play titled “Real Women Have Curves.” Lopez’s 1994 comedy, made into a 2002 movie that marked America Ferrera’s film debut, is about many things. Its subjects include the fears of undocument..

Stephen Adly Guirgis won the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for drama for his darkly comic “Between Riverside and Crazy.” Two years later, as GableStage’s sizzling new production so abundantly demonstrates, the play feels completely of the moment – in part because its characters traffic in “alternative facts.” Retired New York cop Walter “Pops” Washington (Leo Finnie) refuses to settle an eight-..

Neo-Impressionist Georges Seurat was an influential visionary whose pointillist work launched a movement before his untimely death in Paris in 1891 at the age of 31. He spent two years painting his masterpiece, “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte,” in which tiny dots of juxtaposed color viewed at the right distance transform into a host of Parisians relaxing on an island ..

Thirty-two playwrights, a half dozen directors, and around ninety plays in less than two hours. This is the South Florida One-Minute Play Festival, now in its fifth year, which runs this weekend. The festival, performed at the Deering Estate in Palmetto Bay and curated by Caitlin Wees and Dominic D’Andrea, has become a phenomenon in its own right. South Florida’s version of the festival i..

Mention the Harlem Renaissance, and those who know their history would be able to tell you a little or a lot about that vibrant period in New York’s black social and cultural life. But bring up the New York Renaissance – also known as the Renaissance Big Five or the Rens – and you’d be likely to stump anyone who isn’t steeped in basketball lore. Playwright and director Layon Gray ..

Listen up, humanity. God has a bone (or 10) to pick with us, and we’d best pay attention. I mean, if he can zap the wing off an argumentative archangel – and he can – just imagine what’s in store for us. Or simply consider the news, post-election. David Javerbaum, the Emmy Award-winning executive producer and head writer of Comedy Central’s much-missed “The Daily Show with Jon Ste..

I saw Lorca en un vestido verde, the Spanish-language version of Nilo Cruz’s play Lorca in a Green Dress eight years ago on a cramped stage in Little Havana’s Teatro Ocho, where Rolando Moreno took on the task of directing four actors who play eight roles. Even with the limitations of the production, Cruz’s inventive and lyrical script made Lorca one of my favorites from the Pulitzer Priz..

Kleber Mendonça Filho’s Aquarius (2016) is a masterful and engaging film exploring the dilemma of a singularly strong-willed, exceedingly attractive older woman who refuses to budge when power comes knocking at her door and tries to blow it off its hinges. A relative newbie to the director’s chair, Mendonça is a former film critic who layers a rich texture of skillfully developed metaphor..

The words that South Florida playwright Michael McKeever has chosen for his intense new play ‘After’ are powerful indeed. They would have to be, since his Zoetic Stage world premiere at Miami’s Arsht Center is a devastating piece about bullying, school violence and the moment when one horrific act destroys two families. But just as powerful as the words in “After” are the silences, as..

It is an awe-inspiring experience to see the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater dancers perform. They are well trained dancers, athletes and artists. Not often known is that some of the dance..

Back for an 8th season in Miami, the legendary Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater packs the house every year. With Liberty City hometown hero Robert Battle in his fifth year, we have many rea..

Awash in sunlight, around 50 women stand in a circle on the rooftop performance space of Casa Gaia in Old Havana, Cuba, as part of a belly-dance festival. Biodanza facilitator Karen Rodríguez..

Choreographer Jeanguy Saintus works primarily from Port-au-Prince, Haiti, but his creative work has global appeal. He is a pioneering artist who blends Haiti’s traditional music and dance alo..

New life for a legacy ballet—a veritable choreographer-magnet—created a great buzz about Miami City Ballet’s third program this season. But at the Arsht Center for the Performing ..

Who doesn’t delight in fairies? Miami City Ballet, for the success of its third program of the season, is certainly banking on one. And, instead of wielding a magic wand, she comes eager to p..

Transgendered performance artist Scott Turner Schofield is a collector of stories. Growing up in the South, the tales that were told about the gay and trans community were the ugliest kind of..

The Miami Theater Center in Miami Shores is giving experimental dancer-choreographer Lazaro Godoy the opportunity to interweave his visual arts and performance passions in ArMOUR, a multimedi..

The Aspen Santa Fe Ballet artistic director Tom Mossbrucker and executive director Jean-Philippe Malaty have thrilled audiences world wide with stimulating and exciting performances, and Miam..

Seduced by the jazz in his dad’s music collection, a kid from Perth, Western Australia, takes up the saxophone at age 13. He grows up, moves to the United States and becomes a star. Dreams do..

Half way through his set at the North Beach Bandshell, singerDavid Crosby (http://www.davidcrosby.com/), 75, who has been to a festival or two in his illustrious career, paused between songs..

Florida in February has its own magic: gorgeous light, cooler temperatures, clear skies and soft sea breezes. Now, imagine those breezes carrying the moaning strains of Esperanza Spalding’s b..

“Heaven sends us habits in place of happiness,” two women of a certain age observe in a famous line from Tchaikovsky’s opera Eugene Onegin. Yet the new Florida Grand Opera production makes th..

Nikolaj Znaider played in an orchestra for the first time at the age of nine, two years after he began to study violin. He still remembers the sense of discovery, as he listened to the childr..

Sun-drenched it is, but Miami is sound-drenched as well. Parrots screech complaints from the Grove’s canopy of palms. I-95 is a perpetual sound lab of squeaking brakes, tires rubbing asphalt ..

Flamenco and jazz have had a fitful relationship. The early, tentative approaches — such as the notable Sketches of Spain (1960) by Miles Davis and Gil Evans or Jazz Flamenco (1967) by ..

Creating music from car horns and bicycles and other non-instruments isn't new. Composer and conceptualist John Cage waxed poetic about traffic noise saying that there is a way "to capture an..

South Florida music lovers have a rare chance to see a homegrown star in concert - and there’s no admission charge. Bobby Thomas Jr., described by jazz legend Melton Mustafa as “the badde..

Arca Images: Sedimentando un camino firme para el teatro en Miami.

Photo: Nil Cruz and Alexa Kuva; Photo by Asela Torres.
Written by: Mia Leonin
Article Rating

En su discurso de recibimiento del Premio Nobel, el poeta chileno Pablo Neruda afirmó que el poeta no es un "pequeño dios." De hecho expresó que el mejor poeta “es el hombre que nos entrega el pan de cada día: el panadero más próximo, que no se cree Dios. El cumple su majestuosa y humilde faena de amasar, meter al horno, dorar y entregar el pan de cada día, como una obligación comunitaria.”

La actriz Alexa Kuve y el dramaturgo y director Nilo Cruz hablan sobre su compañía de teatro Arca Images con esa misma dedicación y sencillez nerudiana. Kuve, en el papel de directora ejecutiva, y Cruz, como director artístico, no pierden tiempo en alabar la magia detrás del telón sino se empeñan en ofrecerles a los ciudadanos de Miami una dieta constante de teatro de alta calidad.

Además de producir las obras de Cruz, quien ganó el premio Pulitzer en el año 2003 por su obra Ana in the Tropics, el equipo de Arca Images pretende llevar algunos clásicos al público. Este martes 20 de septiembre, están presentando una lectura dramatizada de Romeo y Julieta de Shakespeare, traducido por Pablo Neruda, en el Miami-Dade County Auditorium.

Hablábamos con Kuve y Cruz sobre su compañía, la experiencia de hacer teatro en Miami, y la traducción al Bardo de Neruda.

Háblame un poquito de Arca Images, no tanto como institución pero como sueño y meta. ¿Qué querías lograr con este espacio cuando arrancaste en el 2001? ¿Cuáles son las metas para el futuro?

Alexa Kuve: Arca surge como una necesidad. La necesidad de trabajar, de no esperar por los proyectos sino de crearlos. Surge como una complicidad entre amigos, Larry Villanueva, Carlos Caballero y yo…en la sala de mi casa… con ganas de “hacer” …sin grandes aspiraciones. Con el paso del tiempo ese sueño y esas ganas han crecido y han dado frutos y hoy en día ocupan la mayor parte de mi tiempo y de mi vida. Ahora el sueño es lograr establecernos como una compañía sólida de producción de teatro, ser una fuente de trabajo estable para nuestros compañeros artistas y seguir brindando lo mejor de nosotros a nuestra ciudad.

¿Qué es lo más gratificante y lo más difícil de producir teatro en Miami?

Kuve: Producir teatro es siempre un reto, especialmente para un público tan variado y que no piensa en Miami como una ciudad para ir a ver teatro. Cuando viajamos a ciudades como Nueva York, Chicago, o fuera de aquí a México D.F., Buenos Aires o Madrid, por mencionar algunas, pensamos en lo que la cartelera teatral está ofreciendo. No pasa eso con nuestra ciudad, por lo que es una labor de tenacidad crear un nombre que la gente reconozca y siga, como lo hemos estado haciendo con nuestra compañía, especialmente desde que contamos con el trabajo invaluable de Nilo Cruz como director artístico y el apoyo del Miami-Dade County Auditorium.

Lo más gratificante es ser una fuente de trabajo para tantos artistas valiosos con los que contamos y que, en la mayoría de los casos, no pueden desarrollar una carrera fructífera como merecen; es ver la sala llena y el público receptivo y agradecido por nuestro trabajo, es hacer un Tío Vania en Miami y que sea un éxito tanto a nivel artístico como comercial, es trabajar con colegas y amigos que se convierten en familia.

Lo más difícil es conseguir los fondos para llevar a cabo producciones del nivel de las que hemos realizado.

¿Desde cuándo formas parte del equipo de Arca Images como director artístico?

Nilo Cruz: Ya hace más de tres años que me integré a la compañía. Siempre quise tener un teatro o trabajar con un equipo de actores y diseñadores para lograr el verdadero trabajo escénico que solo ocurre en las tablas, donde la palabra se une al gesto y a la acción para crear una serie de momentos e imágenes que solo pueden ser concebidas en esta tercera dimensión.

Tienes una larga trayectoria como dramaturgo y director. ¿Qué te gustaría lograr en el papel de director artístico de Arca Images?

Cruz: Me gustaría no solamente explorar mis textos como director, sino también dirigir las obras de otros dramaturgos contemporáneos a los que admiro. Además, me interesa muchísimo revisitar a los clásicos. Mi misión como director artístico es traer teatro de calidad a nuestra ciudad.

¿Qué tiene de especial, o de particular, producir teatro aquí en Miami?

Cruz: Miami es una ciudad de eventos esporádicos, carece de constancia. Nosotros estamos tratando de establecer una continuidad a través de las obras que presentamos en el Miami Dade County Auditorium— algo que es imprescindible para el desarrollo de las artes y también para el crecimiento del público. Nos interesa reactivar la costumbre de ir al teatro como cuando se visita a un vecino o cuando se viaja a otro país, para explorar y descubrir otras culturas y ver cómo vive la humanidad en otras parte del mundo.

¿Cómo descubriste la traducción de Neruda?

Cruz: La descubrí cuando estaba estudiando en la universidad de Brown. Tomé un curso basado en las obras de Shakespeare. Estaba en la biblioteca haciendo una investigación y en una de las referencias apareció su traducción, como un sueño inesperado. La busqué de inmediato en los laberintos de libros, comencé a leerla, y sentí el mismo deslumbramiento que percibí cuando leí la original por primera vez a los doce años.

¿Qué distingue la versión libre de Neruda de otras traducciones?

Cruz: En que Neruda es poeta, y solo los poetas deben traducir las obras de Shakespeare. En su traducción, Neruda no se deja llevar por las rimas del texto, sino por la resonancia de las palabras y la profundidad de los momentos creados a través de los personajes. Neruda conoce muy bien el alma y el corazón. Lo que ocurre en la tragedia de Romeo y Julieta es que el corazón no escucha a la razón, por eso los amantes de Verona se dejan llevar por el vuelo de la pasión y el amor los devora. La obra está llena de poesía y prima la belleza, ya que la belleza siempre está a favor de la paz y la justicia. Aquí se denuncia la muerte de dos almas inocentes, víctimas de la injusticia, y nadie mejor que Neruda supo trasladar la belleza que abunda en esta obra a nuestra lengua.

¿Algo más que quisieras comunicar sobre la obra y/o la compañía Arca Images?

Kuve: Junto al Miami-Dade County Auditorium, y bajo la iniciativa de Javier Siut, estamos ofreciendo tres producciones de alto nivel artístico y dos lecturas dramatizadas cada año. Las lecturas son gratuitas, solo se necesita reservar a través de nuestro correo electrónico arcaimages@gmail.com. Con esto buscamos ofrecer al público de Miami entretenimiento y cultura al nivel de la ciudad que ya hemos construido y seguimos forjando. Somos el reflejo de una comunidad variada y compleja. Venimos de muchas partes y nos encontramos en esta ciudad que ya es nuestro hogar. La cultura identifica a los pueblos y nosotros buscamos plasmar esa identidad.

Tenemos muchos sueños, queremos expandirnos y ofrecer más actividades gratuitas e incorporar programas educativos a nuestra misión. Seguimos trabajando con amor…lo único con lo que se puede hacer teatro

Este martes 20 de septiembre, a las 7:30 p.m., están presentando una lectura dramatizada de Romeo y Julieta de Shakespeare, traducido por Pablo Neruda. Se presentarán en el Miami-Dade County Auditorium, en el On Stage Black Box, 2901 W. Flagler Street, y la entrada es gratis.

 


Deja un comentario ...
Debe estar registrado
No one logged in. Log in
Deja un comentario ...
Was this helpful?
No Very

Captcha Image

Acerca del autor

Dance writer and theater critic, senior lecturer in English Composition, University of Miami

Mia Leonin is the author of two books of poetry, Braid and Unraveling the Bed (Anhinga Press), and the memoir, Havana and Other Missing Fathers (U..

About the Writer