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A Way of Life – Siempre Flamenco’s Festival de Cante Flamenco

Photo: Rocio Bazan; photo credit: Remedios Malvarez
Written by: Sean Erwin
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The name Flamenco conjures the machine-gun snap of heels, arms arched overhead, the flick of red fabric and laser-like glares from beneath the starched black brim of a Cordobes hat. At the edges of a bright spotlight sit a semi-anonymous guitarist and singer providing musical backdrop for all the dancer’s sinewy goodness.

Husband and wife team Celia and Paco Fonta would like to change that. For the Fontas the power of flamenco stems principally from the singer, not the dancer, and the couple have programmed their 12th annual Festival de Cante Flamenco (Friday through Sunday at the Arsht Center) to emphasize flamenco as principally a sung art form.
Flamenco appeared in the South of Spain as a music of exile. The roots of the music stem from the cries of suffering experienced by certain communities at the time of the Spanish Inquisition. Telling the story by telephone, Celia Fonta explained, “Flamenco was born out of the suffering caused by the expulsion from Spain of the Jews, Gypsies and Moors, and the music owes its character to the experience of each of these communities.”
For the Fontas, the legend of flamenco’s emergence captures a basic truth -- flamenco is principally a vocal art. As she added: “Globalization has caused flamenco to take on many forms as it fused with other art forms. We find this interesting but we don’t lose sight of the fact that flamenco is first and foremost a conversation that occurs between singer and guitarist. The dancer accompanies and follows those two.”
The performance of flamenco has a lot in common with jazz, where informal rules guide the musicians. Because the rules are open-ended the same songs sound very different from one night to the next.
As Paco Fonta explains, both guitarists and singers value spontaneity. For Fonta, an accomplished flamenco guitarist, “we follow some rules and we know how it goes. Every night might be very different because from night to night someone may decide to do something entirely different. We may decide to give more room to the singer, and in the authentic flamenco performance the real bosses are the singers.”
At this year’s festival the “bosses” include vocalists Morenito de Illora, Joselito Montoya and Rocio Bazan. “One of the great values of this festival is that we can introduce Miami audiences to great flamenco singers who are well-known in Spain but not so well known here in Miami,” adds Paco.
The up-close experience of the 200-seat Carnival Center provides a great venue for experiencing flamenco short of a seat at an authentic Spanish tablao (singing club). Though the Pacos find the focus of flamenco in the vocalist, lovers of the dance form need not worry.
“We have invited world renowned dancer Angel Rojas,” continued Celia. “Yes, the dance came later, but of course we bring in the dance for the sake of the audiences. The legend of flamenco tells us how the dance began. First, we had people singing as they worked the anvil, and then they began to tap their feet to the songs, and from the foot tapping the dance developed. This all makes sense so long as we remember that the flamenco music came first.”
In 2016 the Fontas were the recipients of the 2016 Florida Folk Heritage Award -- the state’s highest honor for folk and traditional arts. They received the award as recognition that the aim of Siempre Flamenco is not only to entertain but also to educate. For the couple this is critical because flamenco for them is more than just a musical form. As Celia explains:
“Duende (soul) names the moment when flamenco becomes a way of life. It describes a transcendental moment but not a religious experience per se. The singer and the dancer go through a catharsis to get out of the sadness, the melancholy and the drama of life –– and in the experience of flamenco music we come out of it renewed. Duende doesn’t happen all the time, but you can say the lover of flamenco is someone engaged in la busqueda del duende (the search for soul).”

The 12th Festival de Cante Flamenco, Friday through Sunday, September 1 to 3 Arsht Center’s Carnival Studio Theater (1300 Biscayne Bay Boulevard, Miami); tickets cost $48;

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About The writer

Sean Erwin is a writer and assistant professor of Philosophy at Barry University, with a focus on aesthetics and contemporary french philosophy.
Sean Erwin is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Barry University and received his Masters and Doctorate in Philosophy from Vanderbilt. He has presented and published on topics in political philosophy, Italian and French philosophy, and technology and performance studies. He currently serves as the senior editor of the Humanities and Technology Review.

Erwin is also a performance critic for Artburst, with performance previews and reviews appearing regularly there and in other South Florida publications. Artburst gives him the platform to critique the aesthetic principles he writes on as a professional philosopher through analysis of the concrete movements embodied by performers.

He is also an accomplished dancer and teacher in the Argentine Tango community. In 2000 he founded and served as editor of the Chicago webzine, Tango Noticias, a specialty dance periodical dedicated to examining Argentine Tango as a set of social practices rooted to the Southern cone’s history, politics, and culture.

Since his move to South Florida, he has both taught philosophy and served as a principal tango instructor for the Miami-based, Shimmy Club, a non-profit program that teaches Argentine Tango to vision-impaired teens. Through his involvement with the program, Erwin has been featured in articles and several news outlets including Univision, Telemundo, NBC News, KPFK Los Angeles, and the Miami Herald. For more information, see


About the Writer

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