The Source for Media Coverage of The Arts in Miami.
Articles, reviews, previews and features on dance and music performances and events.
Sign Up
No one logged in. Log in

Writing about “Broken Snow,” the Ben Andron thriller now getting its world premiere at the J’s Cultural Arts Theatre (JCAT) in North Miami Beach, is a proposition almost as tricky as the play itself. The intricately structured 90-minute drama is loaded with surprises, twists and turns, all revealed at precisely the right moment so that the play builds to its shattering conclusion..

As this steamy spring melts into a sweltering summer, Actors’ Playhouse is inviting theater lovers to a wedding – a big, fat Jewish-WASP wedding, otherwise known as the Broadway musical “It Shoulda Been You.” Though the show seemingly takes place in the present, the piece by book writer-lyricist Brian Hargrove and composer Barbara Anselmi is an old-fashioned, stereotype-filled throwba..

'Death & Harry Houdini' Makes Another Magical Moment at ArshtDennis Watkins knows how to make an entrance. In the House Theatre of Chicago’s “Death & Harry Houdini,” now back at the Arsht Center’s Carnival Studio Theater five years after it first wowed Miami audiences, Watkins arrives onstage with the help of theater technology unknown in Houdini’s day. Dangling upside dow..

Director Carlos Lechuga’s masterful unspooling of time in his second feature film “Santa y Ándres” constructs a uniquely Cuban mix of tedium and despair, resulting in an emotionally intense experience that sneaks up on the viewer in plain sight. The film opens with the stillness of a landscape painting: the eastern Cuban countryside of 1983 – rugged, lush, and verdant. The statuesque..

Memory – deep-seated, fragile, slippery, mutable – is at the heart of Jordan Harrison’s “Marjorie Prime.” A Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2015, the play is a family tragicomedy given a sci-fi makeover; in other words, this thought-provoking theater piece charts its own, fresh path. Now getting its South Florida premiere as the second professional production from the Main Street Players, ..

The stage is a fixed space. It is the axis around which story, conflict, and character revolve. When that fixed space shifts, new possibilities emerge. Starting Wednesday, April 23, a shifting site for theater emerges at Deering Estate, a 444-acre environmental, archeological, and historical preserve along the edge of Biscayne Bay in Palmetto Bay. Four local playwrights have collaborated ..

Nearly two years ago, Miami’s Zoetic Stage took its first trip into the world of Harold Pinter with an intense, superbly acted production of the Nobel laureate’s 1978 hit “Betrayal” in the Arsht Center’s Carnival Studio Theater. Now Zoetic is delving further back into the Pinter canon with a riveting production of “The Caretaker.” This 1960 work is, like “Betrayal,” a three-character ..

Imagine animation created live on stage, with mini backdrops, puppets, and low-tech props. Channel it through multiple cameras and mix it live into a projected film. Add a string quartet and a DJ. This is the structure of “Nufonia Must Fall,” an upcoming project presented by MDC Live Arts. The show is slated for appearances around the world, from Asia and the Middle East to Europe and..

That Actors’ Playhouse opened its production of Robert Schenkkan’s “All the Way” on the same day that the American Health Care Act was pulled from a vote by the House of Representatives is ironic and more than a little instructive. The much-touted replacement for Obamacare didn’t have enough sure votes to ensure passage, as Speaker Paul Ryan told President Donald Trump, so the “replac..

The take-no-prisoners world of high finance and ruthless business deals has long been a tantalizing subject for artists. From filmmaker Oliver Stone’s 1987 “Wall Street,” with its antihero Gordon Gekko spouting “greed is good,” to Damien Lewis’ slick hedge fund mogul Bobby Axelrod in the Showtime series “Billions,” movies and television allow those of us in the 99 percent a glimpse at wha..

May’s “Mujeres” series of strong, multi-faceted, women-focused productions, commissioned for Miami Theater Center’s SandBox space, concludes with Spanish-born dancer-choreographer Carlota Pr..

One could say that Bistoury’s 305 & Havana International Improv Fest, which debuts this Saturday at Miami Theater Center, has been in the works for almost 20 years. In 1999 Cuban-born cho..

The process of creating “Shade,” choreographer Augusto Soledade’s latest full-length work, has been one of remembering and reconfiguring memory to discover new ways of talking about identity ..

Upcoming this week, Tigertail presents choreographer Myriam Gourfink and musician Kasper Toeplitz. Hailing from France, the two will be present for a 3-day residency at Subtropics’ South Beac..

From her home base at 6th Street Dance Studio in Little Havana, longtime Miami dance figure Brigid Baker has been slowly crafting a new performance piece. It’s not conceptual or political like con..

Karen Peterson is the artistic director of Karen Peterson and Dancers, a company that brings professional dancers with and without disabilities together in the same piece of choreography, and..

Revivals are hot on Broadway these days with “CATS”and “Hello, Dolly!“once again gracing the Great White Way. There is a certain nostalgia in taking a second or even third viewing of a belove..

What happens when urban dance style meets classical music? We’ll find out when Brooklyn-based hip-hop dance troupe Decadancetheater takes the stage, backed by Miami’s own experimental classic..

“What does it mean to belong? What does it mean to not want to belong?” These are questions that choreographer Reggie Wilson contemplates in his provocative piece “CITIZEN,“ which makes its M..

Project 305 has a simple aim – crowd-source a Miami symphony. For 100 days from January 31 to May 12 New World Symphony, in collaboration with the Knight Foundation and the M.I.T. Media Lab, ..

You hear the word “flamenco” -- what image comes to mind? A guitar? A dark-haired dancer? The color red, a ruffled dress? Did a piano by any chance enter the picture? Perhaps not. Pianist..

Critics on five continents have described her work as “indecent and breathtaking,” or some close variant. One blessed her for always “going too far.” Another stated he would prefer death to m..

Buzzing his lips and shaking his head, Rafael Davila gets ready to rehearse. In the Florida Grand Opera’s cavernous rehearsal hall in Doral, the floor is marked with tape to delineate the roo..

There’s a song James Blood Ulmer sings called “Jazz Is the Teacher, Funk is the Preacher.” If you bring in Mother Blues, along with the family hothead, Rock and Roll, you’ll have a better pi..

Ask about the Miami Sound to 10 people in South Florida and you’ll get 11 different answers. And yet, for more than 20 years, the Spam Allstars, a group founded and anchored by DJ Le Spam (a..

This year’s TransAtlantic Festival features local dance music stars, a Malian guitarist known as “the Hendrix of the Sahara,” and something unique: a Haitian rara band comprised entirely of women...

If the political movement that saw its birth after the November elections is in the market for a composer to set the score for its many marches, Frederic Rzewski might be a strong contender f..

In a combo that promises to be both sublime and rip-roaring, three generations of Cuban and Cuban diaspora musicians come together this Saturday at The Miami-Dade County Auditorium to celebra..

Luna Fluorescente va profundo al mundo de la ceguera

Photo: José Manuel Domínguez; photo by Anthony Maldonado.
Written by: Mia Leonin
Article Rating

 

En un discurso de 1977, el escritor argentino Jorge Luis Borges desmintió la idea de que la ceguera fuera un mundo de oscuridad cuando describió su propia “modesta ceguera”. Hablaba de ciertos colores, como el rojo, que le había abandonado por completo, mientras que otros, como el amarillo, nunca le habían sido infieles. Borges dijo: “El mundo del ciego no es la noche que la gente supone”.

En su último proyecto, Luna Fluorescente, el dramaturgo, actor y director José Manuel Domínguez afirma la idea de Borges de que aún la ceguera tiene sus matices. Es más, la obra revela diversos modos de experimentar el mundo sin verlo.

Domínguez, quien es ciego, dirige un elenco de tres actores ciegos basado en sus experiencias. El mismo título se inspira en una anécdota de uno de los actores, Roberto Pérez, y su obsesión desde niño de ver la luna. Un día, su papá, desesperado por darle a su hijo alguna idea de la luna, le mostró un tubo circular fluorescente. Años después, cuando Pérez estudió en la universidad, fue un gran choque para él encontrar otra descripción mas científica de la luna y sus verdaderas proporciones. Es justamente esa distinción, las variadas maneras de apercibir algo, lo que intrigó a Domínguez y sus actores. Hablamos con Domínguez, fundador de la compañía de teatro Antihéroes Project, sobre la obra – sus retos e innovaciones.

¿De qué se trata la obra?

Luna Fluorescente es un recorrido por ciertos aspectos y momentos de la vida de tres personas ciegas. Ellos han sido invitados por Antihéroes a tomar parte de este proyecto donde poco a poco van revelando vivencias y secretos de la vida de los niños ciegos que alguna vez fueron hasta su llegada a la adolescencia. No es una obra biográfica, al menos no en el estilo convencional. Ciertamente, la mayoría de los episodios que se representan están completamente anclados en la vida de ellos; sin embargo, solo han sido privilegiados aquellos momentos que de alguna manera nos ayudaron a hablar del impacto de la falta de visión en el descubrimiento del mundo.

La obra es también la obra de las personas que rodearon en su infancia a los protagonistas (Roberto Pérez, Danays Bautista, Emilio Bouza), los padres, los abuelos, los primos y los amigos que de alguna manera ocuparon, y ocupan todavía, un lugar importante en la vida de ellos. No todos han podido estar. Sólo algunos en representación de esos héroes anónimos que día a día inventaron juegos, formas y medios llenos de ingenio para hacerle entender el mundo a estos niños para los cuales vivir sin visión ha sido parte de sus realidades.

¿Como surgió la idea de la obra?

Un día, un grupo de amigos conversaba sobre temas intrascendentes. Se trataba de una charla como otra cualquiera, pero entre nosotros existían un par de puntos de interés:

¿Cómo ve – descubre sería una palabra más apropiada – el mundo una persona ciega? Entre nosotros algunos eran ciegos de nacimiento y otros no. La conversación se volvió tan interesante que nos pareció que podía ser de interés para otras personas.

En principio, pensamos en la posibilidad de hacer solo un video informal y subirlo a YouTube. Pero luego comenzamos a barajar la posibilidad de llevar esta conversación al lenguaje teatral. No nos hizo falta investigar mucho para darnos cuenta que la forma y los límites del mundo de una persona ciega rara vez han sido llevados al teatro. Como el tema estaba tan conectado con la labor de Antihéroes, lo único que necesitábamos eran los fondos para producirla y lanzarnos al reto.

Háblame un poquito sobre los actores. Creo que me has dicho que no son actores por profesión.

Correcto. Dos de ellos son artistas profesionales, con una larga carrera en la música, pero no tienen experiencia alguna en el teatro. El otro (Roberto), protagonista de la anécdota que le da título a la obra, es uno de los primeros ciegos en graduarse como ingenieros en computación de la Universidad de la Habana. Lo conocí en el Miami Dade College adonde él había ido en busca de una pasantía o experiencia de trabajo para personas con discapacidades y de ahí nació una gran amistad. En varias conversaciones con él y con su esposa, Danays Bautista, la cantante y compositora cubana que por aquel entonces radicaba en Madrid. Con ellos y con otro pequeño grupo de personas y colaboradores de Antihéroes fuimos armando la idea.

Un día me presentaron a Emilio Bouza, otro músico cubano recién llegado a la ciudad de Miami y con quién enseguida me conecté. Por supuesto, entre Robert, Danays y yo no tardamos mucho en comentarle sobre la idea. Tanto él como Robert habían querido estudiar actuación alguna vez en sus vidas. Era una página que se les había quedado sin llenar y enseguida que comenzamos a improvisar me di cuenta de que tenían mucho talento, un sentido del humor y una agudeza privilegiada. Danays estaba a la par en todos los sentidos, además de que aportaba el aspecto musical a la obra.

En principio, hablamos de la posibilidad de que entre ella y Emilio compusieran la música, pero al final decidí que estaba bien que disfrutaran de su trabajo como actores y los dejara descansar de lo que habían hecho toda su vida, o sea, la música.

Todos estos atributos nos han ido guiando a lo largo del proceso y lo han hecho muy divertido. Las conversaciones con los tres actores fueron y han seguido siendo hilarantes, disparatadas, ocurrentes, geniales pero en todo momento estamos evaluando si lo que hemos dicho o pensado es algo que podría pasar a formar parte del arsenal de recuerdos y emociones que permearían o enriquecerían la obra.

El proceso de trabajo ha traído, junto a los ensayos y a las sesiones de laboratorio e improvisación, clases de movimiento dictadas por Lucia Aratanha, una bailarina y coreógrafa de origen brasileño de amplia trayectoria nacional e internacional. Era parte de la idea original, que los actores tuvieran un entrenamiento apropiado para que verdaderamente conocieran, sintieran, experimentaran, no solo la parte divertida y clara del teatro, sino también las largas horas de entrenamiento y ejercicios de actuación que a menudo no conducían a ningún resultado a corto plazo.

La inclusión es una de las metas más importantes de Antihéroes Project. ¿Cómo puede un espectador ciego o con la vista muy limitada experimentar la obra?

Hay un actor muy joven y estudiante del college (Mateo Goicochea-19 años) que ha hecho antes “voiceover” profesionalmente. El estará a cargo del “audio description”. Tendrá un doble rol, el de hacer de “audio describer” y contraparte de los muchachos ciegos. La segunda parte la hará como si hablara desde dentro de un caracol utilizando un megáfono u otro efecto especial. El caracol representa el personaje Yorick de “Hamlet”. Seguro recuerdas el famoso monólogo de Hamlet hablándole a un cadáver. Ese personaje se llama Yorick. Tiene una fuerza simbólica y un valor muy alto porque de un modo sutil habla sobre lo efímero de la vida. La otra parte como “audio describer” será audible para todos pues hay momentos en que la obra está toda a oscuras, o sea, en “blackout”, y Yorick relata cosas que deberían o podrían estar sucediendo fuera del alcance de la vista del público, sea ciego o no.

El servicio de “audio description” es muy caro y solo lo tienen algunos de los teatros más grandes, como el Arsht Center y el South Dade. Así es que no, no tendremos audífonos. El público escuchará la voz del actor en vivo. Incorporar esta forma de “audio description” no ortodoxa es la manera que hemos encontrado de resolver el problema, dado que se trata de un trabajo hecho por actores ciegos y que atraerá a nuestros amigos ciegos también. Lo hace más accesible, pero a la vez permite reflexionar sobre la condición de estar ciego y recibir la información de un modo narrado. Queremos que por momentos sea algo común para todos, o sea, poner a todo el mundo en la situación de no poder ver. Esto solo lo haremos en dos momentos en toda la obra. El resto del tiempo, el personaje de Yorick hará una especie de contrapunteo con los actores. Ellos tienen un caracol en la mano y eso es lo que ve todo el mundo, pero Yorick asegura que él no es un caracol, que él es un cadáver. Esto nos lleva por el camino de qué es lo que vemos, o sea, si lo que vemos es realmente lo que es o no. Es medio complejo y en la obra no vamos a profundizar en eso, pero ahí quedará planteada la idea de un modo medio humorístico.

‘Luna Fluorescente’ 28 de octubre a 12 de noviembre. Entrada gratis.

MDC Live Arts Lab (Teatro Prometeo), Miami Dade College, Wolfson Campus, 300 NE 2nd Ave., Miami; viernes 28 y sábado 29 de octubre: 8:00 p.m.

Centro Cultural Español de Cooperación Iberoamericana en Miami, 1490 Biscayne Blvd., Miami; jueves 4, viernes 5 y sábado 6 de noviembre: 8:00 PM

Main Library Downtown, 101 W. Flagler, Miami; sábado 12 de noviembre: 3:00 p.m.

 


 


Deja un comentario ...
Debe estar registrado
No one logged in. Log in
Deja un comentario ...
Was this helpful?
No Very

Captcha Image

Acerca del autor

Dance writer and theater critic, senior lecturer in English Composition, University of Miami

Mia Leonin is the author of two books of poetry, Braid and Unraveling the Bed (Anhinga Press), and the memoir, Havana and Other Missing Fathers (U..

About the Writer