The Source for Media Coverage of The Arts in Miami.
Articles, reviews, previews and features on dance and music performances and events.
Sign Up
No one logged in. Log in

My Barbarian wanted to take Miami on a boat ride. “We wanted to interact and be out in the public,” Alex Segade reveals over the phone from Los Angeles, where he just got out of rehearsal for My Barbarian’s first Miami show, coming up this Saturday at the Miami Light Project, as part of Miami-Dade College’s Museum of Art and Design’s “Living Together” performance series this season. ..

The time seems right for Karen Finley to be visiting Miami, to be performing in the black box space of the Miami Light Project at the Goldman Warehouse, and to present her latest performance-art manifesto about the current political landscape, “Unicorn Gratitude Mystery.” In the show, which she began developing as a response to the U.S. presidential election in 2016, Finley plays a unicor..

Getting into a true holiday spirit can be tough in South Florida, where palm trees, expansive beaches and balmy skies signal perpetual summer. Ever-earlier store décor and the incessant push to buy presents – more about commercialism than celebration – can make many of us feel more anxious than festive. Not to worry. Just squeeze in a trip to Miami’s Arsht Center, where City Theatre h..

One of the centerpieces of this year’s Art Week is not a static art work, and it is also one of the most sensuous and disorienting. Lebanese performance artist Tania El Khoury is producing her “Gardens Speak” for the week, courtesy of MDC Live Arts, a piece that has been applauded in cultural capitals throughout Europe and the United States. “It is a work,” she says, “that can only co..

Since its founding in 1996, City Theatre has been an important part of South Florida’s theatrical landscape, though the company’s visibility has always been highest in the month of June. That’s when its popular Summer Shorts festival takes place; for more than a decade, its high-profile venue has been the Carnival Studio Theater at Miami’s Arsht Center. Though the company founded by S..

If you were to predict who might become a nationally famous – OK, world-famous – multiplatform sex therapist, Dr. Ruth Westheimer would probably not be your first choice. Born in Germany in 1928 as Karola Ruth Siegel, the 4’7” Dr. Ruth seems more like the doting Jewish grandmother she is than a woman who used her nationally syndicated radio show, TV shows and 40-some books to help hun..

Actors’ Playhouse has been a musical powerhouse for much of its history. Launching its 30th anniversary season at the Miracle Theatre in Coral Gables, the company is revisiting some of that history with a new production of a made-for-South Florida favorite: Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s “Evita.” As it did in 2000 when recent Tony Award winner Rachel Bay Jones starred as Eva Duart..

Playwright Suzan-Lori Parks won the Pulitzer Prize for “Topdog/Underdog” in 2002. But as Zoetic Stage’s superb new production of the play at Miami’s Arsht Center demonstrates, her funny, shocking tale of two brothers struggling to survive is as potent today as it was 15 years ago. Maybe more so, given the country’s deepening divide. Parks’ harrowing drama examines the complex relation..

We are born. We live, have families, grow old. We die, leaving those who loved us to mourn. Playwright Thornton Wilder brilliantly captured the eternal verities of our journey through life in “Our Town,” his 1938 Pulitzer Prize-winning play about life, love and death in a small New Hampshire town at the turn of the 20th century. If you’re at all drawn to theater, you’ve probably ..

“Miami Motel Stories: Little Havana” written by Juan C. Sanchez, directed by Tamilla Woodard, and produced by Juggerknot Theatre Company, is a site-specific, immersive theater experience that interweaves narrative, performance, history and architecture. Nine short plays take place in nine hotel rooms on the second floor of the Tower Hotel, right off Calle Ocho on Seventh Street. Sanchez, ..

With the closing of Tigertail Productions last year, Miami lost one of its preeminent artistic champions. Under the direction of founder Mary Luft, Tigertail brought an endless parade of boundary-..

Anytime would be a good time to devote a dance program to the works of Jerome Robbins, our most versatile and celebrated American-born choreographer. But, given that 2018 marks the centennial..

Due to winter storms in the Northeast impacting travel, with great regrets the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company announced the cancellation of the Saturday, Jan. 6 performance. At age..

It is fitting at this time of the year that our thoughts often turn to what connects us not what divides us. Whether we are driven by religious or secular motives, many of us are in the spiri..

The end of the 19th century was a golden age for ballet. In 15 years of collaboration, two great Russian geniuses – choreographer Marius Petipa, and composer Pyotr Tchaikovsky – produced ballet st..

Here’s a riddle – name the 1892 box office flop panned by critics for lack of seriousness and for casting too many kids, which has now transformed into a force of nature timed to occur yearly..

It happens every year, right around Thanksgiving, productions of the Nutcracker pop up from coast to coast, marking the start of the holiday season. But on Saturday, Miami audiences have the ..

As Art Week approaches, Miami choreographer Marissa Alma Nick’s Alma Dance Theater is getting ready to add its distinctive voice, rehearsing for the upcoming performance of “Flowers” at the C..

Promising a night of airiness and ardor, Dimensions Dance Theatre of Miami will bring “Ballet’s Pointe of Passion” to the South Miami-Dade Cultural Arts Center, where the company joins an att..

People often imagine new artwork is the product of the solitary artist genius slaving away in lonely studios. The South Florida Symphony’s 20th anniversary program foregrounds a different vis..

At an age when many are winding down their working lives, Ignacio Berroa eagerly anticipates a new stage in his career. It would be understandable if the 64-year-old drummer, recognized a..

We know it’s the holiday season when trees light up, menorah candles start to burn, ubiquitous Christmas carols pipe through drugstores, “The Nutcracker” plays on every stage – and in recent ..

Late last year, on Dec. 20, 2016, Romero Britto and Mark Bryn hosted the Great Artists Series Cocktail Reception at the Britto Fine Art Gallery to celebrate the legendary impresaria, Judy Dru..

Everyone remembers a lost weekend, binge reading a novel whose ending had to wait because the body just gave out. No matter how compelling the story somewhere around the 30th hour the brain s..

Globalization has produced many stories —not all inspiring. But having a Pakistani ensemble become a worldwide sensation by playing Paul Desmond’s immortal “Take Five,” which pianist Da..

When the management of New York’s iconic Apollo Theater approached drummer Gregg Field last year about organizing a concert there in honor of the 100th anniversary of Ella Fitzgerald’s birth..

They’ve opened a Chanel fashion show in Havana and been featured in Beyoncé’s visual album for “Lemonade.” The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater has danced to their music. Their Florida debu..

There are few artists who have had the impact in their disciplines that guitarist Paco De Lucía had in flamenco. There is a before-and-after De Lucía in flamenco. He expanded the harmonic voc..

Luna Fluorescente va profundo al mundo de la ceguera

Photo: José Manuel Domínguez; photo by Anthony Maldonado.
Written by: Mia Leonin
Article Rating

 

En un discurso de 1977, el escritor argentino Jorge Luis Borges desmintió la idea de que la ceguera fuera un mundo de oscuridad cuando describió su propia “modesta ceguera”. Hablaba de ciertos colores, como el rojo, que le había abandonado por completo, mientras que otros, como el amarillo, nunca le habían sido infieles. Borges dijo: “El mundo del ciego no es la noche que la gente supone”.

En su último proyecto, Luna Fluorescente, el dramaturgo, actor y director José Manuel Domínguez afirma la idea de Borges de que aún la ceguera tiene sus matices. Es más, la obra revela diversos modos de experimentar el mundo sin verlo.

Domínguez, quien es ciego, dirige un elenco de tres actores ciegos basado en sus experiencias. El mismo título se inspira en una anécdota de uno de los actores, Roberto Pérez, y su obsesión desde niño de ver la luna. Un día, su papá, desesperado por darle a su hijo alguna idea de la luna, le mostró un tubo circular fluorescente. Años después, cuando Pérez estudió en la universidad, fue un gran choque para él encontrar otra descripción mas científica de la luna y sus verdaderas proporciones. Es justamente esa distinción, las variadas maneras de apercibir algo, lo que intrigó a Domínguez y sus actores. Hablamos con Domínguez, fundador de la compañía de teatro Antihéroes Project, sobre la obra – sus retos e innovaciones.

¿De qué se trata la obra?

Luna Fluorescente es un recorrido por ciertos aspectos y momentos de la vida de tres personas ciegas. Ellos han sido invitados por Antihéroes a tomar parte de este proyecto donde poco a poco van revelando vivencias y secretos de la vida de los niños ciegos que alguna vez fueron hasta su llegada a la adolescencia. No es una obra biográfica, al menos no en el estilo convencional. Ciertamente, la mayoría de los episodios que se representan están completamente anclados en la vida de ellos; sin embargo, solo han sido privilegiados aquellos momentos que de alguna manera nos ayudaron a hablar del impacto de la falta de visión en el descubrimiento del mundo.

La obra es también la obra de las personas que rodearon en su infancia a los protagonistas (Roberto Pérez, Danays Bautista, Emilio Bouza), los padres, los abuelos, los primos y los amigos que de alguna manera ocuparon, y ocupan todavía, un lugar importante en la vida de ellos. No todos han podido estar. Sólo algunos en representación de esos héroes anónimos que día a día inventaron juegos, formas y medios llenos de ingenio para hacerle entender el mundo a estos niños para los cuales vivir sin visión ha sido parte de sus realidades.

¿Como surgió la idea de la obra?

Un día, un grupo de amigos conversaba sobre temas intrascendentes. Se trataba de una charla como otra cualquiera, pero entre nosotros existían un par de puntos de interés:

¿Cómo ve – descubre sería una palabra más apropiada – el mundo una persona ciega? Entre nosotros algunos eran ciegos de nacimiento y otros no. La conversación se volvió tan interesante que nos pareció que podía ser de interés para otras personas.

En principio, pensamos en la posibilidad de hacer solo un video informal y subirlo a YouTube. Pero luego comenzamos a barajar la posibilidad de llevar esta conversación al lenguaje teatral. No nos hizo falta investigar mucho para darnos cuenta que la forma y los límites del mundo de una persona ciega rara vez han sido llevados al teatro. Como el tema estaba tan conectado con la labor de Antihéroes, lo único que necesitábamos eran los fondos para producirla y lanzarnos al reto.

Háblame un poquito sobre los actores. Creo que me has dicho que no son actores por profesión.

Correcto. Dos de ellos son artistas profesionales, con una larga carrera en la música, pero no tienen experiencia alguna en el teatro. El otro (Roberto), protagonista de la anécdota que le da título a la obra, es uno de los primeros ciegos en graduarse como ingenieros en computación de la Universidad de la Habana. Lo conocí en el Miami Dade College adonde él había ido en busca de una pasantía o experiencia de trabajo para personas con discapacidades y de ahí nació una gran amistad. En varias conversaciones con él y con su esposa, Danays Bautista, la cantante y compositora cubana que por aquel entonces radicaba en Madrid. Con ellos y con otro pequeño grupo de personas y colaboradores de Antihéroes fuimos armando la idea.

Un día me presentaron a Emilio Bouza, otro músico cubano recién llegado a la ciudad de Miami y con quién enseguida me conecté. Por supuesto, entre Robert, Danays y yo no tardamos mucho en comentarle sobre la idea. Tanto él como Robert habían querido estudiar actuación alguna vez en sus vidas. Era una página que se les había quedado sin llenar y enseguida que comenzamos a improvisar me di cuenta de que tenían mucho talento, un sentido del humor y una agudeza privilegiada. Danays estaba a la par en todos los sentidos, además de que aportaba el aspecto musical a la obra.

En principio, hablamos de la posibilidad de que entre ella y Emilio compusieran la música, pero al final decidí que estaba bien que disfrutaran de su trabajo como actores y los dejara descansar de lo que habían hecho toda su vida, o sea, la música.

Todos estos atributos nos han ido guiando a lo largo del proceso y lo han hecho muy divertido. Las conversaciones con los tres actores fueron y han seguido siendo hilarantes, disparatadas, ocurrentes, geniales pero en todo momento estamos evaluando si lo que hemos dicho o pensado es algo que podría pasar a formar parte del arsenal de recuerdos y emociones que permearían o enriquecerían la obra.

El proceso de trabajo ha traído, junto a los ensayos y a las sesiones de laboratorio e improvisación, clases de movimiento dictadas por Lucia Aratanha, una bailarina y coreógrafa de origen brasileño de amplia trayectoria nacional e internacional. Era parte de la idea original, que los actores tuvieran un entrenamiento apropiado para que verdaderamente conocieran, sintieran, experimentaran, no solo la parte divertida y clara del teatro, sino también las largas horas de entrenamiento y ejercicios de actuación que a menudo no conducían a ningún resultado a corto plazo.

La inclusión es una de las metas más importantes de Antihéroes Project. ¿Cómo puede un espectador ciego o con la vista muy limitada experimentar la obra?

Hay un actor muy joven y estudiante del college (Mateo Goicochea-19 años) que ha hecho antes “voiceover” profesionalmente. El estará a cargo del “audio description”. Tendrá un doble rol, el de hacer de “audio describer” y contraparte de los muchachos ciegos. La segunda parte la hará como si hablara desde dentro de un caracol utilizando un megáfono u otro efecto especial. El caracol representa el personaje Yorick de “Hamlet”. Seguro recuerdas el famoso monólogo de Hamlet hablándole a un cadáver. Ese personaje se llama Yorick. Tiene una fuerza simbólica y un valor muy alto porque de un modo sutil habla sobre lo efímero de la vida. La otra parte como “audio describer” será audible para todos pues hay momentos en que la obra está toda a oscuras, o sea, en “blackout”, y Yorick relata cosas que deberían o podrían estar sucediendo fuera del alcance de la vista del público, sea ciego o no.

El servicio de “audio description” es muy caro y solo lo tienen algunos de los teatros más grandes, como el Arsht Center y el South Dade. Así es que no, no tendremos audífonos. El público escuchará la voz del actor en vivo. Incorporar esta forma de “audio description” no ortodoxa es la manera que hemos encontrado de resolver el problema, dado que se trata de un trabajo hecho por actores ciegos y que atraerá a nuestros amigos ciegos también. Lo hace más accesible, pero a la vez permite reflexionar sobre la condición de estar ciego y recibir la información de un modo narrado. Queremos que por momentos sea algo común para todos, o sea, poner a todo el mundo en la situación de no poder ver. Esto solo lo haremos en dos momentos en toda la obra. El resto del tiempo, el personaje de Yorick hará una especie de contrapunteo con los actores. Ellos tienen un caracol en la mano y eso es lo que ve todo el mundo, pero Yorick asegura que él no es un caracol, que él es un cadáver. Esto nos lleva por el camino de qué es lo que vemos, o sea, si lo que vemos es realmente lo que es o no. Es medio complejo y en la obra no vamos a profundizar en eso, pero ahí quedará planteada la idea de un modo medio humorístico.

‘Luna Fluorescente’ 28 de octubre a 12 de noviembre. Entrada gratis.

MDC Live Arts Lab (Teatro Prometeo), Miami Dade College, Wolfson Campus, 300 NE 2nd Ave., Miami; viernes 28 y sábado 29 de octubre: 8:00 p.m.

Centro Cultural Español de Cooperación Iberoamericana en Miami, 1490 Biscayne Blvd., Miami; jueves 4, viernes 5 y sábado 6 de noviembre: 8:00 PM

Main Library Downtown, 101 W. Flagler, Miami; sábado 12 de noviembre: 3:00 p.m.

 


 


Deja un comentario ...
Debe estar registrado
No one logged in. Log in
Deja un comentario ...
Was this helpful?
No Very

Captcha Image

Acerca del autor

Dance writer and theater critic, senior lecturer in English Composition, University of Miami

Mia Leonin is the author of two books of poetry, Braid and Unraveling the Bed (Anhinga Press), and the memoir, Havana and Other Missing Fathers (U..

About the Writer