The Source for Media Coverage of The Arts in Miami.
Articles, reviews, previews and features on dance and music performances and events.
Sign Up
No one logged in. Log in

Artburst Portal

The take-no-prisoners world of high finance and ruthless business deals has long been a tantalizing subject for artists. From filmmaker Oliver Stone’s 1987 “Wall Street,” with its antihero Gordon Gekko spouting “greed is good,” to Damien Lewis’ slick hedge fund mogul Bobby Axelrod in the Showtime series “Billions,” movies and television allow those of us in the 99 percent a glimpse at wha..

Miami’s venerable M Ensemble is a company that sometimes dips into its rich history to mount fresh productions of past shows. For its second production in its versatile new home at the Sandrell Rivers Theater in Liberty City, the troupe is revisiting Darren Canady’s “Brothers of the Dust.” Winner of the 2012 M. Elizabeth Osborn Award from the American Theatre Critics Association, the ..

“El cuento de Rene,” actor and director Larry Villanueva’s adaptation of Cuban writer Rene Ariza’s short stories into a work of theater, is more than an homage. It’s a statement on oppression. Ariza was sentenced to eight years in prison for trying to send manuscripts abroad. He was banned from creating theater in Cuba and condemned as “counter-revolutionary.” Ariza served five years of h..

Those who attend film festivals aren't looking for the mainstream, Cineplex offerings. That isn't the goal. Amid the indie films, the foreign entries, documentaries, and the world premieres, there's another reason to canvass the program for something you might not see anywhere else. Given the Miami Film Festival is the only major film festival to be produced by a college or university..

{This interview was conducted before the film making team went on to amazing Oscar success.} Playwright Tarell Alvin McCraney and filmmaker Barry Jenkins are nine miles away from the Liberty City housing projects where they both grew up, but they are worlds away. They are at the picturesque Standard Hotel to talk about the new movie "Moonlight," with a screenplay by Jenkins base..

First things first. Actor-playwright Elena María García does explain the meaning of “¡FUÁCATA!” somewhere deep into the 90-minute running time of Zoetic Stage’s “García Or a Latina’s Guide to Surviving the Universe.” The familiar Cuban term, she confides from her perch on Michael McKeever’s Mondrian-evocative set, suggests the sound of a slap. As in, “¡Fuácata! You really stepped in i..

Sales of George Orwell’s chilling dystopian novel “1984” have soared during the early days of the Trump administration, the headlines pouring out of Washington having repositioned a 1949 literary classic as a 21st century cautionary tale. The late Czech president and playwright Václav Havel brought his deeply observed, hard-earned perspective on life under totalitarianism to the stage..

“Carousel,” which contains some of the most gorgeous and memorable songs ever written for a musical, may be a musical you’ve never seen, though it has been around since 1945. The follow-up to “Oklahoma!,” Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II’s hugely successful debut as a composer-lyricist team, “Carousel” requires a huge cast by today’s standards, an orchestra that can do that gl..

Before women like movie star Melissa McCarthy, Chrissy Metz of NBC’s “This Is Us” and Whitney Thore of TLC’s “My Big Fat Fabulous Life” became widely embraced personalities, Josefina Lopez wrote a play titled “Real Women Have Curves.” Lopez’s 1994 comedy, made into a 2002 movie that marked America Ferrera’s film debut, is about many things. Its subjects include the fears of undocument..

Stephen Adly Guirgis won the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for drama for his darkly comic “Between Riverside and Crazy.” Two years later, as GableStage’s sizzling new production so abundantly demonstrates, the play feels completely of the moment – in part because its characters traffic in “alternative facts.” Retired New York cop Walter “Pops” Washington (Leo Finnie) refuses to settle an eight-..

Ballet Flamenco La Rosa’s studio evokes the feel of a tablao in Spain. The strumming of the guitar, the rapid-fire rhythms of footwork against the floor, and the soft voice of the singer reac..

Miami choreographer Augusto Soledade has been a fixture in the local dance world since he arrived here in 2004. His cast has shifted over the years and he continues to challenge himself artis..

In one duet, two dancers use their bodies as counterweights, springing forth from each other’s bodies with explosive power. In another, dancers form a sharp line before torsos undulate and fa..

Teacher, choreographer and activist Dale Andree is known for her ability to merge activism with dance. Andree founded and directs National Water Dance, a site-specific project that joins danc..

In 2016, Philadelphia-based Koresh Dance company crossed their 25-year mark. To celebrate, the company returns to Miami’s Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts with a 25th anniversary..

From singers like Joan Baez to poets like Maya Angelou to anonymous knitters of pink pussy hats, creative women have played an essential role in this country as agitators and activists. Likew..

When Dimensions Dance Theatre of Miami (DDTM) takes the stage this weekend, it will present a program rich in the cultural milieu of Miami. Co-founders Jennifer Kronenberg and Carlos Guerra i..

It is an awe-inspiring experience to see the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater dancers perform. They are well trained dancers, athletes and artists. Not often known is that some of the dance..

Back for an 8th season in Miami, the legendary Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater packs the house every year. With Liberty City hometown hero Robert Battle in his fifth year, we have many rea..

In a combo that promises to be both sublime and rip-roaring, three generations of Cuban and Cuban diaspora musicians come together this Saturday at The Miami-Dade County Auditorium to celebra..

Despite an end to the “wet foot, dry foot” policy and other changes in the Florida-Cuba dynamic, Global Cuba Fest 2017 will continue to satiate the souls of South Floridians with a month-long..

Guitarist, composer and producer Josemi Carmona embodies the spirit of Nuevo Flamenco. Rooted firmly in tradition, he has proven a restless, curious artist, ignoring the boundaries of genres ..

Following an intense National YoungArts Week, the signature program held annually in Miami, YoungArts is proud to announce their 2017 regional programs that will expand the offerings from New..

Seduced by the jazz in his dad’s music collection, a kid from Perth, Western Australia, takes up the saxophone at age 13. He grows up, moves to the United States and becomes a star. Dreams do..

Half way through his set at the North Beach Bandshell, singerDavid Crosby (http://www.davidcrosby.com/), 75, who has been to a festival or two in his illustrious career, paused between songs..

Florida in February has its own magic: gorgeous light, cooler temperatures, clear skies and soft sea breezes. Now, imagine those breezes carrying the moaning strains of Esperanza Spalding’s b..

“Heaven sends us habits in place of happiness,” two women of a certain age observe in a famous line from Tchaikovsky’s opera Eugene Onegin. Yet the new Florida Grand Opera production makes th..

Nikolaj Znaider played in an orchestra for the first time at the age of nine, two years after he began to study violin. He still remembers the sense of discovery, as he listened to the childr..

Luna Fluorescente va profundo al mundo de la ceguera

Photo: José Manuel Domínguez; photo by Anthony Maldonado.
Written by: Mia Leonin
Article Rating

 

En un discurso de 1977, el escritor argentino Jorge Luis Borges desmintió la idea de que la ceguera fuera un mundo de oscuridad cuando describió su propia “modesta ceguera”. Hablaba de ciertos colores, como el rojo, que le había abandonado por completo, mientras que otros, como el amarillo, nunca le habían sido infieles. Borges dijo: “El mundo del ciego no es la noche que la gente supone”.

En su último proyecto, Luna Fluorescente, el dramaturgo, actor y director José Manuel Domínguez afirma la idea de Borges de que aún la ceguera tiene sus matices. Es más, la obra revela diversos modos de experimentar el mundo sin verlo.

Domínguez, quien es ciego, dirige un elenco de tres actores ciegos basado en sus experiencias. El mismo título se inspira en una anécdota de uno de los actores, Roberto Pérez, y su obsesión desde niño de ver la luna. Un día, su papá, desesperado por darle a su hijo alguna idea de la luna, le mostró un tubo circular fluorescente. Años después, cuando Pérez estudió en la universidad, fue un gran choque para él encontrar otra descripción mas científica de la luna y sus verdaderas proporciones. Es justamente esa distinción, las variadas maneras de apercibir algo, lo que intrigó a Domínguez y sus actores. Hablamos con Domínguez, fundador de la compañía de teatro Antihéroes Project, sobre la obra – sus retos e innovaciones.

¿De qué se trata la obra?

Luna Fluorescente es un recorrido por ciertos aspectos y momentos de la vida de tres personas ciegas. Ellos han sido invitados por Antihéroes a tomar parte de este proyecto donde poco a poco van revelando vivencias y secretos de la vida de los niños ciegos que alguna vez fueron hasta su llegada a la adolescencia. No es una obra biográfica, al menos no en el estilo convencional. Ciertamente, la mayoría de los episodios que se representan están completamente anclados en la vida de ellos; sin embargo, solo han sido privilegiados aquellos momentos que de alguna manera nos ayudaron a hablar del impacto de la falta de visión en el descubrimiento del mundo.

La obra es también la obra de las personas que rodearon en su infancia a los protagonistas (Roberto Pérez, Danays Bautista, Emilio Bouza), los padres, los abuelos, los primos y los amigos que de alguna manera ocuparon, y ocupan todavía, un lugar importante en la vida de ellos. No todos han podido estar. Sólo algunos en representación de esos héroes anónimos que día a día inventaron juegos, formas y medios llenos de ingenio para hacerle entender el mundo a estos niños para los cuales vivir sin visión ha sido parte de sus realidades.

¿Como surgió la idea de la obra?

Un día, un grupo de amigos conversaba sobre temas intrascendentes. Se trataba de una charla como otra cualquiera, pero entre nosotros existían un par de puntos de interés:

¿Cómo ve – descubre sería una palabra más apropiada – el mundo una persona ciega? Entre nosotros algunos eran ciegos de nacimiento y otros no. La conversación se volvió tan interesante que nos pareció que podía ser de interés para otras personas.

En principio, pensamos en la posibilidad de hacer solo un video informal y subirlo a YouTube. Pero luego comenzamos a barajar la posibilidad de llevar esta conversación al lenguaje teatral. No nos hizo falta investigar mucho para darnos cuenta que la forma y los límites del mundo de una persona ciega rara vez han sido llevados al teatro. Como el tema estaba tan conectado con la labor de Antihéroes, lo único que necesitábamos eran los fondos para producirla y lanzarnos al reto.

Háblame un poquito sobre los actores. Creo que me has dicho que no son actores por profesión.

Correcto. Dos de ellos son artistas profesionales, con una larga carrera en la música, pero no tienen experiencia alguna en el teatro. El otro (Roberto), protagonista de la anécdota que le da título a la obra, es uno de los primeros ciegos en graduarse como ingenieros en computación de la Universidad de la Habana. Lo conocí en el Miami Dade College adonde él había ido en busca de una pasantía o experiencia de trabajo para personas con discapacidades y de ahí nació una gran amistad. En varias conversaciones con él y con su esposa, Danays Bautista, la cantante y compositora cubana que por aquel entonces radicaba en Madrid. Con ellos y con otro pequeño grupo de personas y colaboradores de Antihéroes fuimos armando la idea.

Un día me presentaron a Emilio Bouza, otro músico cubano recién llegado a la ciudad de Miami y con quién enseguida me conecté. Por supuesto, entre Robert, Danays y yo no tardamos mucho en comentarle sobre la idea. Tanto él como Robert habían querido estudiar actuación alguna vez en sus vidas. Era una página que se les había quedado sin llenar y enseguida que comenzamos a improvisar me di cuenta de que tenían mucho talento, un sentido del humor y una agudeza privilegiada. Danays estaba a la par en todos los sentidos, además de que aportaba el aspecto musical a la obra.

En principio, hablamos de la posibilidad de que entre ella y Emilio compusieran la música, pero al final decidí que estaba bien que disfrutaran de su trabajo como actores y los dejara descansar de lo que habían hecho toda su vida, o sea, la música.

Todos estos atributos nos han ido guiando a lo largo del proceso y lo han hecho muy divertido. Las conversaciones con los tres actores fueron y han seguido siendo hilarantes, disparatadas, ocurrentes, geniales pero en todo momento estamos evaluando si lo que hemos dicho o pensado es algo que podría pasar a formar parte del arsenal de recuerdos y emociones que permearían o enriquecerían la obra.

El proceso de trabajo ha traído, junto a los ensayos y a las sesiones de laboratorio e improvisación, clases de movimiento dictadas por Lucia Aratanha, una bailarina y coreógrafa de origen brasileño de amplia trayectoria nacional e internacional. Era parte de la idea original, que los actores tuvieran un entrenamiento apropiado para que verdaderamente conocieran, sintieran, experimentaran, no solo la parte divertida y clara del teatro, sino también las largas horas de entrenamiento y ejercicios de actuación que a menudo no conducían a ningún resultado a corto plazo.

La inclusión es una de las metas más importantes de Antihéroes Project. ¿Cómo puede un espectador ciego o con la vista muy limitada experimentar la obra?

Hay un actor muy joven y estudiante del college (Mateo Goicochea-19 años) que ha hecho antes “voiceover” profesionalmente. El estará a cargo del “audio description”. Tendrá un doble rol, el de hacer de “audio describer” y contraparte de los muchachos ciegos. La segunda parte la hará como si hablara desde dentro de un caracol utilizando un megáfono u otro efecto especial. El caracol representa el personaje Yorick de “Hamlet”. Seguro recuerdas el famoso monólogo de Hamlet hablándole a un cadáver. Ese personaje se llama Yorick. Tiene una fuerza simbólica y un valor muy alto porque de un modo sutil habla sobre lo efímero de la vida. La otra parte como “audio describer” será audible para todos pues hay momentos en que la obra está toda a oscuras, o sea, en “blackout”, y Yorick relata cosas que deberían o podrían estar sucediendo fuera del alcance de la vista del público, sea ciego o no.

El servicio de “audio description” es muy caro y solo lo tienen algunos de los teatros más grandes, como el Arsht Center y el South Dade. Así es que no, no tendremos audífonos. El público escuchará la voz del actor en vivo. Incorporar esta forma de “audio description” no ortodoxa es la manera que hemos encontrado de resolver el problema, dado que se trata de un trabajo hecho por actores ciegos y que atraerá a nuestros amigos ciegos también. Lo hace más accesible, pero a la vez permite reflexionar sobre la condición de estar ciego y recibir la información de un modo narrado. Queremos que por momentos sea algo común para todos, o sea, poner a todo el mundo en la situación de no poder ver. Esto solo lo haremos en dos momentos en toda la obra. El resto del tiempo, el personaje de Yorick hará una especie de contrapunteo con los actores. Ellos tienen un caracol en la mano y eso es lo que ve todo el mundo, pero Yorick asegura que él no es un caracol, que él es un cadáver. Esto nos lleva por el camino de qué es lo que vemos, o sea, si lo que vemos es realmente lo que es o no. Es medio complejo y en la obra no vamos a profundizar en eso, pero ahí quedará planteada la idea de un modo medio humorístico.

‘Luna Fluorescente’ 28 de octubre a 12 de noviembre. Entrada gratis.

MDC Live Arts Lab (Teatro Prometeo), Miami Dade College, Wolfson Campus, 300 NE 2nd Ave., Miami; viernes 28 y sábado 29 de octubre: 8:00 p.m.

Centro Cultural Español de Cooperación Iberoamericana en Miami, 1490 Biscayne Blvd., Miami; jueves 4, viernes 5 y sábado 6 de noviembre: 8:00 PM

Main Library Downtown, 101 W. Flagler, Miami; sábado 12 de noviembre: 3:00 p.m.

 


 


Deja un comentario ...
Debe estar registrado
No one logged in. Log in
Deja un comentario ...
Was this helpful?
No Very

Captcha Image

Acerca del autor

Dance writer and theater critic, senior lecturer in English Composition, University of Miami

Mia Leonin is the author of two books of poetry, Braid and Unraveling the Bed (Anhinga Press), and the memoir, Havana and Other Missing Fathers (U..

About the Writer