The Source for Media Coverage of The Arts in Miami.
Articles, reviews, previews and features on dance and music performances and events.
Sign Up
No one logged in. Log in

Writing about “Broken Snow,” the Ben Andron thriller now getting its world premiere at the J’s Cultural Arts Theatre (JCAT) in North Miami Beach, is a proposition almost as tricky as the play itself. The intricately structured 90-minute drama is loaded with surprises, twists and turns, all revealed at precisely the right moment so that the play builds to its shattering conclusion..

As this steamy spring melts into a sweltering summer, Actors’ Playhouse is inviting theater lovers to a wedding – a big, fat Jewish-WASP wedding, otherwise known as the Broadway musical “It Shoulda Been You.” Though the show seemingly takes place in the present, the piece by book writer-lyricist Brian Hargrove and composer Barbara Anselmi is an old-fashioned, stereotype-filled throwba..

'Death & Harry Houdini' Makes Another Magical Moment at ArshtDennis Watkins knows how to make an entrance. In the House Theatre of Chicago’s “Death & Harry Houdini,” now back at the Arsht Center’s Carnival Studio Theater five years after it first wowed Miami audiences, Watkins arrives onstage with the help of theater technology unknown in Houdini’s day. Dangling upside dow..

Director Carlos Lechuga’s masterful unspooling of time in his second feature film “Santa y Ándres” constructs a uniquely Cuban mix of tedium and despair, resulting in an emotionally intense experience that sneaks up on the viewer in plain sight. The film opens with the stillness of a landscape painting: the eastern Cuban countryside of 1983 – rugged, lush, and verdant. The statuesque..

Memory – deep-seated, fragile, slippery, mutable – is at the heart of Jordan Harrison’s “Marjorie Prime.” A Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2015, the play is a family tragicomedy given a sci-fi makeover; in other words, this thought-provoking theater piece charts its own, fresh path. Now getting its South Florida premiere as the second professional production from the Main Street Players, ..

The stage is a fixed space. It is the axis around which story, conflict, and character revolve. When that fixed space shifts, new possibilities emerge. Starting Wednesday, April 23, a shifting site for theater emerges at Deering Estate, a 444-acre environmental, archeological, and historical preserve along the edge of Biscayne Bay in Palmetto Bay. Four local playwrights have collaborated ..

Nearly two years ago, Miami’s Zoetic Stage took its first trip into the world of Harold Pinter with an intense, superbly acted production of the Nobel laureate’s 1978 hit “Betrayal” in the Arsht Center’s Carnival Studio Theater. Now Zoetic is delving further back into the Pinter canon with a riveting production of “The Caretaker.” This 1960 work is, like “Betrayal,” a three-character ..

Imagine animation created live on stage, with mini backdrops, puppets, and low-tech props. Channel it through multiple cameras and mix it live into a projected film. Add a string quartet and a DJ. This is the structure of “Nufonia Must Fall,” an upcoming project presented by MDC Live Arts. The show is slated for appearances around the world, from Asia and the Middle East to Europe and..

That Actors’ Playhouse opened its production of Robert Schenkkan’s “All the Way” on the same day that the American Health Care Act was pulled from a vote by the House of Representatives is ironic and more than a little instructive. The much-touted replacement for Obamacare didn’t have enough sure votes to ensure passage, as Speaker Paul Ryan told President Donald Trump, so the “replac..

The take-no-prisoners world of high finance and ruthless business deals has long been a tantalizing subject for artists. From filmmaker Oliver Stone’s 1987 “Wall Street,” with its antihero Gordon Gekko spouting “greed is good,” to Damien Lewis’ slick hedge fund mogul Bobby Axelrod in the Showtime series “Billions,” movies and television allow those of us in the 99 percent a glimpse at wha..

May’s “Mujeres” series of strong, multi-faceted, women-focused productions, commissioned for Miami Theater Center’s SandBox space, concludes with Spanish-born dancer-choreographer Carlota Pr..

One could say that Bistoury’s 305 & Havana International Improv Fest, which debuts this Saturday at Miami Theater Center, has been in the works for almost 20 years. In 1999 Cuban-born cho..

The process of creating “Shade,” choreographer Augusto Soledade’s latest full-length work, has been one of remembering and reconfiguring memory to discover new ways of talking about identity ..

Upcoming this week, Tigertail presents choreographer Myriam Gourfink and musician Kasper Toeplitz. Hailing from France, the two will be present for a 3-day residency at Subtropics’ South Beac..

From her home base at 6th Street Dance Studio in Little Havana, longtime Miami dance figure Brigid Baker has been slowly crafting a new performance piece. It’s not conceptual or political like con..

Karen Peterson is the artistic director of Karen Peterson and Dancers, a company that brings professional dancers with and without disabilities together in the same piece of choreography, and..

Revivals are hot on Broadway these days with “CATS”and “Hello, Dolly!“once again gracing the Great White Way. There is a certain nostalgia in taking a second or even third viewing of a belove..

What happens when urban dance style meets classical music? We’ll find out when Brooklyn-based hip-hop dance troupe Decadancetheater takes the stage, backed by Miami’s own experimental classic..

“What does it mean to belong? What does it mean to not want to belong?” These are questions that choreographer Reggie Wilson contemplates in his provocative piece “CITIZEN,“ which makes its M..

Project 305 has a simple aim – crowd-source a Miami symphony. For 100 days from January 31 to May 12 New World Symphony, in collaboration with the Knight Foundation and the M.I.T. Media Lab, ..

You hear the word “flamenco” -- what image comes to mind? A guitar? A dark-haired dancer? The color red, a ruffled dress? Did a piano by any chance enter the picture? Perhaps not. Pianist..

Critics on five continents have described her work as “indecent and breathtaking,” or some close variant. One blessed her for always “going too far.” Another stated he would prefer death to m..

Buzzing his lips and shaking his head, Rafael Davila gets ready to rehearse. In the Florida Grand Opera’s cavernous rehearsal hall in Doral, the floor is marked with tape to delineate the roo..

There’s a song James Blood Ulmer sings called “Jazz Is the Teacher, Funk is the Preacher.” If you bring in Mother Blues, along with the family hothead, Rock and Roll, you’ll have a better pi..

Ask about the Miami Sound to 10 people in South Florida and you’ll get 11 different answers. And yet, for more than 20 years, the Spam Allstars, a group founded and anchored by DJ Le Spam (a..

This year’s TransAtlantic Festival features local dance music stars, a Malian guitarist known as “the Hendrix of the Sahara,” and something unique: a Haitian rara band comprised entirely of women...

If the political movement that saw its birth after the November elections is in the market for a composer to set the score for its many marches, Frederic Rzewski might be a strong contender f..

In a combo that promises to be both sublime and rip-roaring, three generations of Cuban and Cuban diaspora musicians come together this Saturday at The Miami-Dade County Auditorium to celebra..

La Flaka, una cantaora para el siglo XXI

Photo: La Flaka
Written by: Fernando Gonzalez
Article Rating

El flamenco es una música de fusión. La tradición es de sobrevivencia, de cambio constante y adaptación al lugar y los tiempos. Mientras el sonido puede ser diferente, el espíritu de Nuevo Flamenco es el del flamenco de siempre. “La Flaka”, Jessica Cánovas, es una cantaora del siglo XXI. Ella incorpora en su música elementos del soul, R&B, electrónica o jazz; puede cantar bulerías y escribir sus propias canciones, pero también hacer suyos temas de Alejandro Sanz, Djavan, Gloria Estefan o The Police.

La Flaka, acompañada por un grupo que incluye a Junior Míguez, baile y programación; Pepe Pulido, guitarra, y Daniel González en percusión, presentará su primer disco en solitario, Capricho, el viernes 20 de mayo a las 8 p.m. en el Miami-Dade County Auditorium. El concierto, su debut en los Estados Unidos, es parte del festival FlamenGo presentado por el Centro Cultural Español de Miami.

Nacida y criada en el histórico barrio de Triana, un referente de la cultura flamenca en la orilla del Guadalquivir en Sevilla, La Flaka creció rodeada de música. Su bisabuela, su abuelo, su madre, todos cantaban, cuenta ella, pero ninguno lo hizo profesionalmente. “Les daba vergüenza, y en esto, si tienes vergüenza, no va”, dice La Flaka con inconfundible acento andaluz, y rompe a reír. Sólo su tía África, a quien ella acompañó sobre el escenario con apenas 11 años, llegó a tener una carrera profesional, grabando un disco y haciendo giras.

Algún recuerdo de esa experiencia en el escenario debe haber quedado en la niña, porque La Flaka, 30, comenzó ya de joven a cantar localmente y fue corista para el músico de hip hop flamenco y bailarín Junior Míguez, una figura de la nueva generación de artistas flamencos.

Míguez es hoy también su esposo y productor.

Un momento importante para La Flaka fue cuando la gran cantaora Lole Montoya, quizás mejor conocida como parte del dúo Lole y Manuel, la invitó a ser parte de su ensamble para una presentación en el Festival de Músicas del Mundo en Portugal, en el 2010. Y sin duda, su carrera recibió un gran espaldarazo cuando La Flaka participó, el año pasado, en la tercera edición de La Voz, un concurso de nuevos talentos en la televisión española. En el show, sus coaches fueron dos estrellas del pop en español, los cantantes Laura Pausini y Alejandro Sanz, y en su participación La Flaka interpretó canciones de Pancho Céspedes (“Remolino”) y Sanz (“Mi soledad y yo”). Aunque fue eliminada en las semifinales, para entonces, La Flaka era ya una favorita de la audiencia.

En anticipo de su presentación, La Flaka habló con Artburst desde su casa en Sevilla.

Tu disco Capricho tiene todo tipo de influencias, flamenco, por supuesto, pero también soul, hip hop, pop y R&B. ¿Cómo has llegado a esa mezcla?

El flamenco ha sido siempre una música de mezclas. Yo creo que el flamenco lo acepta todo, es algo muy abierto. Es que naces en Triana, estás metida en lo mismo todo el tiempo y necesitas innovar, buscar otras cosas. Cuando empezamos a grabar Caprichos tenía claro que no quería hacer un disco de flamenco al uso (como es habitual) porque creo que la vida va avanzando, las épocas van cambiando. Igual, cuando yo canto, la voz me suena flamenca. Es que sale así sola. Si es que desde que uno nace ya lo lleva en la sangre. Eso se tiene. Ya tenemos al flamenco-flamenco. Yo deseaba hacer un disco de flamenco pero con otras cosas porque hay que innovar, hay que avanzar, dar un pasito más adelante.

¿Te preocupan las críticas de los puristas del flamenco?

Es que yo también tengo raíces flamencas-flamencas. Yo he estudiado flamenco- flamenco. Pero me gusta mucho innovar y buscar y escuchar otras músicas. De hecho, lo que menos escucho es flamenco, porque flamenco es lo que tengo en la sangre. Gracias a Dios, he nacido con ello. Entonces, intento beber de otro tipo de música para poder expandirme. Escucho Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, escucho muchas cosas que no son para nada típico del flamenco, por eso el disco tiene un poco de todo — pop, soul, jazz , hasta tiene un poco de electrónica.

¿Cómo fue esa experiencia con Lole Montoya?

Eso de tener la oportunidad de que ella me llame, me lleve de la mano y me diga, ‘Vente conmigo flaquita, que yo confío mucho en ti’, fue fuerte. Recuerdo que en ese festival había gente de muchos países y aquello fue increíble, cómo entendían cuando Lole cantaba. ¡Es que con el flamenco nos entendemos, vamos! Y después hemos hecho más cosas. Es que Lole es del barrio, de toda la vida. Yo conozco a Lole desde cuando yo era un bebé y ella siempre que hace cosas me llama.

En una publicación sevillana hay una cita tuya en la que dices: “No creo que para ser flamenco haya que ponerse un vestido de faralaes”. Parece una declaración de principios.

Es que cuando yo llego a un lugar y me ven me preguntan: ‘Y tú, ¿qué cantas?’, y cuando les digo ‘flamenco’ y me ven con la chaqueta de cuero y vaqueros y el pelo corto, ahí me preguntan, ‘¿Y tú cantas flamenco?’ Sí, yo canto mi flamenco, que no deja de ser flamenco pero es el flamenco que yo siento. Además, a la música hay que aportarle cosas. Encima que la cosa está así, regular, sí también nosotros no vamos innovando y cambiando, ¿que nos queda para el futuro?

WHAT: La Flaka Flamenco fusion

WHEN: Friday, May 20, 8 p.m.

WHERE: Miami-Dade County Auditorium, 2901 W Flagler St. Miami

Info: General: $28. Seniors/ groups/ Students and CCE Miami members: $23 ph 305-547-5414.

 


Deja un comentario ...
Debe estar registrado
No one logged in. Log in
Deja un comentario ...
Was this helpful?
No Very

Captcha Image

Acerca del autor

Music writer, associate editor of the Latin GRAMMY Print & Special Projects for The Latin Recording Academy

Emmy-winner and GRAMMY®-nominated writer, critic, and editor Fernando González is the associate editor of The Latin GRAMMY Print & ..

About the Writer