The Source for Media Coverage of The Arts in Miami.
Articles, reviews, previews and features on dance and music performances and events.
Sign Up
No one logged in. Log in

Writing about “Broken Snow,” the Ben Andron thriller now getting its world premiere at the J’s Cultural Arts Theatre (JCAT) in North Miami Beach, is a proposition almost as tricky as the play itself. The intricately structured 90-minute drama is loaded with surprises, twists and turns, all revealed at precisely the right moment so that the play builds to its shattering conclusion..

'Death & Harry Houdini' Makes Another Magical Moment at ArshtDennis Watkins knows how to make an entrance. In the House Theatre of Chicago’s “Death & Harry Houdini,” now back at the Arsht Center’s Carnival Studio Theater five years after it first wowed Miami audiences, Watkins arrives onstage with the help of theater technology unknown in Houdini’s day. Dangling upside dow..

Director Carlos Lechuga’s masterful unspooling of time in his second feature film “Santa y Ándres” constructs a uniquely Cuban mix of tedium and despair, resulting in an emotionally intense experience that sneaks up on the viewer in plain sight. The film opens with the stillness of a landscape painting: the eastern Cuban countryside of 1983 – rugged, lush, and verdant. The statuesque..

Memory – deep-seated, fragile, slippery, mutable – is at the heart of Jordan Harrison’s “Marjorie Prime.” A Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2015, the play is a family tragicomedy given a sci-fi makeover; in other words, this thought-provoking theater piece charts its own, fresh path. Now getting its South Florida premiere as the second professional production from the Main Street Players, ..

The stage is a fixed space. It is the axis around which story, conflict, and character revolve. When that fixed space shifts, new possibilities emerge. Starting Wednesday, April 23, a shifting site for theater emerges at Deering Estate, a 444-acre environmental, archeological, and historical preserve along the edge of Biscayne Bay in Palmetto Bay. Four local playwrights have collaborated ..

Nearly two years ago, Miami’s Zoetic Stage took its first trip into the world of Harold Pinter with an intense, superbly acted production of the Nobel laureate’s 1978 hit “Betrayal” in the Arsht Center’s Carnival Studio Theater. Now Zoetic is delving further back into the Pinter canon with a riveting production of “The Caretaker.” This 1960 work is, like “Betrayal,” a three-character ..

Imagine animation created live on stage, with mini backdrops, puppets, and low-tech props. Channel it through multiple cameras and mix it live into a projected film. Add a string quartet and a DJ. This is the structure of “Nufonia Must Fall,” an upcoming project presented by MDC Live Arts. The show is slated for appearances around the world, from Asia and the Middle East to Europe and..

That Actors’ Playhouse opened its production of Robert Schenkkan’s “All the Way” on the same day that the American Health Care Act was pulled from a vote by the House of Representatives is ironic and more than a little instructive. The much-touted replacement for Obamacare didn’t have enough sure votes to ensure passage, as Speaker Paul Ryan told President Donald Trump, so the “replac..

The take-no-prisoners world of high finance and ruthless business deals has long been a tantalizing subject for artists. From filmmaker Oliver Stone’s 1987 “Wall Street,” with its antihero Gordon Gekko spouting “greed is good,” to Damien Lewis’ slick hedge fund mogul Bobby Axelrod in the Showtime series “Billions,” movies and television allow those of us in the 99 percent a glimpse at wha..

Miami’s venerable M Ensemble is a company that sometimes dips into its rich history to mount fresh productions of past shows. For its second production in its versatile new home at the Sandrell Rivers Theater in Liberty City, the troupe is revisiting Darren Canady’s “Brothers of the Dust.” Winner of the 2012 M. Elizabeth Osborn Award from the American Theatre Critics Association, the ..

The process of creating “Shade,” choreographer Augusto Soledade’s latest full-length work, has been one of remembering and reconfiguring memory to discover new ways of talking about identity ..

Upcoming this week, Tigertail presents choreographer Myriam Gourfink and musician Kasper Toeplitz. Hailing from France, the two will be present for a 3-day residency at Subtropics’ South Beac..

From her home base at 6th Street Dance Studio in Little Havana, longtime Miami dance figure Brigid Baker has been slowly crafting a new performance piece. It’s not conceptual or political like con..

Karen Peterson is the artistic director of Karen Peterson and Dancers, a company that brings professional dancers with and without disabilities together in the same piece of choreography, and..

Revivals are hot on Broadway these days with “CATS”and “Hello, Dolly!“once again gracing the Great White Way. There is a certain nostalgia in taking a second or even third viewing of a belove..

What happens when urban dance style meets classical music? We’ll find out when Brooklyn-based hip-hop dance troupe Decadancetheater takes the stage, backed by Miami’s own experimental classic..

“What does it mean to belong? What does it mean to not want to belong?” These are questions that choreographer Reggie Wilson contemplates in his provocative piece “CITIZEN,“ which makes its M..

If even a modicum of redemption can be forged from the hellish after-effects of gun violence, we must listen to the communities most affected by the violence. To this end, “Trigger,” a hip-ho..

Celebrating 35 years is an amazing achievement for any dance company in Miami, but especially one founded in a decade better known for its ties to drugs than to the arts. Momentum Dance Compa..

Project 305 has a simple aim – crowd-source a Miami symphony. For 100 days from January 31 to May 12 New World Symphony, in collaboration with the Knight Foundation and the M.I.T. Media Lab, ..

You hear the word “flamenco” -- what image comes to mind? A guitar? A dark-haired dancer? The color red, a ruffled dress? Did a piano by any chance enter the picture? Perhaps not. Pianist..

Critics on five continents have described her work as “indecent and breathtaking,” or some close variant. One blessed her for always “going too far.” Another stated he would prefer death to m..

Buzzing his lips and shaking his head, Rafael Davila gets ready to rehearse. In the Florida Grand Opera’s cavernous rehearsal hall in Doral, the floor is marked with tape to delineate the roo..

There’s a song James Blood Ulmer sings called “Jazz Is the Teacher, Funk is the Preacher.” If you bring in Mother Blues, along with the family hothead, Rock and Roll, you’ll have a better pi..

Ask about the Miami Sound to 10 people in South Florida and you’ll get 11 different answers. And yet, for more than 20 years, the Spam Allstars, a group founded and anchored by DJ Le Spam (a..

This year’s TransAtlantic Festival features local dance music stars, a Malian guitarist known as “the Hendrix of the Sahara,” and something unique: a Haitian rara band comprised entirely of women...

If the political movement that saw its birth after the November elections is in the market for a composer to set the score for its many marches, Frederic Rzewski might be a strong contender f..

In a combo that promises to be both sublime and rip-roaring, three generations of Cuban and Cuban diaspora musicians come together this Saturday at The Miami-Dade County Auditorium to celebra..

Dándole voz a los olvidados: “Silencio Blanco” es teatro de títeres con mucho que decir

Photo: Foto: Lorenzo Mella
Article Rating

Desde Las troyanas de Eurípides hasta “Guernica” de Picasso, o de la canción “Blowing in the Wind” de Bob Dylan al diseño de las gorras rosadas que llevaron miles de mujeres en las protestas del pasado fin de semana, el arte siempre ha tenido un papel fundamental en la consciencia social. Los artistas, sean los de nuestros grandes museos y teatros o sean de la calle, nos hacen enfocarnos—a veces en lo bello, a veces en temas incómodos que tal vez preferiríamos ignorar.

Es este el tipo de arte que crea Teatro Silencio Blanco. La organización Fundarte presenta al grupo el viernes y sábado a las 8:30 pm en el teatro black box del Miami-Dade County Auditorium. Estos cinco titiriteros recibieron su formación como actores en la legendaria Escuela de Teatro de la Universidad de Chile, pero aprendieron el arte de las marionetas a base de la experimentación y de años de práctica en conjunto. Visitarán ocho estados en esta gira, su primera por los Estados Unidos.

Santiago Tobares empezó a adentrarse en el mundo de teatro de títeres solo con una marioneta que colgaba del cuelo. Tomó meses en aprender por sí mismo cómo manipularla. Pronto Dominga Gutiérrez se interesó en el trabajo y juntos recorrieron Chile, Bolivia y Perú haciendo teatro de la calle. Poco a poco el grupo fue creciendo según las exigencias de las historias que querían contar.

“Somos una compañía completamente autodidacta en el tema de la manipulación”, dice Tobares. “Nadie nos enseñó sino que simplemente nosotros nos fuimos encantando con esta nueva manera de lenguaje y eso nos hizo exigirnos también más horas de ensayo, reconocernos un poco más como actores, reconocer nuestros cuerpos”.

La pieza que presentarán este fin de semana trata de Lota, una comunidad que en su momento jugó un papel fundamental en la Revolución Industrial. Lota es una pequeña ciudad chilena que prosperó en los siglos XIX y XX con la industria del carbón. Miles de hombres e inclusive niños trabajaron durante todas sus vidas en Chiflón el Diablo, una de las minas más peligrosas de Chile. Era inmensa, tan grande que sus cavernas extendían hasta debajo del Pacífico.

El trabajo fue arduo, mal remunerado y sumamente arriesgado, no sólo por la posibilidad siempre presente de una explosión o un derrumbe, sino también por los males que sufrían los mineros por trabajar año tras año en un ambiente completamente tóxico, con techos tan bajos que no podían nunca estirar las piernas. “Instalamos todos esos dolores y toda esa enfermedad en la construcción de las marionetas”, dice Tobar.

Irónicamente, es ésta la labor que ha hecho posible las vidas cómodas que nos han brindado a todos la modernización. En el siglo XIX, el carbón alimentaba los motores de las locomotoras y de los buques de carga, y hoy día sigue alimentando plantas de electricidad en muchos lugares. Pero los mineros no se enriquecieron nunca con sus contribuciones a un mundo altamente avanzado en cuanto a tecnología. Todo lo contrario.

Chiflón el Diablo cerró en los años noventa cuando dejó de producir suficiente carbón. Las personas que pasaron sus vidas laborando en sus entrañas ya no tienen manera de subsistir. “Cuando cerró esto, inmediatamente quedó un pueblo fantasma”, señala Tobares. Los miembros de Silencio Blanco, que pasaron cuatro años yendo a Lota y entrevistando a sus ciudadanos para crear esta obra, terminaron haciéndose una pregunta esencial: “¿Cómo un trabajo tan sacrificado que enriqueció a tanta gente de un momento a otro pudo haber quedado en el olvido”?Chiflón, el silencio del carbón no logra una respuesta, sino rescata a los mineros y sus familias del anonimato.

El conjunto consigue contar esta historia con los materiales más básicos posibles: papel de periódico y papel higiénico, un poco de cola de pegar, masking tape, palillos desechables de comida china para manipular las marionetas. En una época en que el costo de hacer una película fácilmente remonta a veinte, treinta, cien millones de dólares, será refrescante ver lo que se puede hacer con unos materiales tan humildes y una gran dosis de arte e imaginación.

La historia está relatada en una serie de imágenes, así que imaginación del espectador también tendrá que esforzarse: “Es una obra en silencio”, señala Tobar, “pero tiene toda la sonoridad del silencio. No necesitamos el texto para contar la historia”. Este silencio también permite que exista un diálogo, especialmente entre las generaciones. Por ejemplo, “si va a ver la obra el papá, el hijo, la mamá con el hijo, permite el diálogo entre ellos, porque si el niño no entiende algo, le va a preguntar al papá y el papálo va a explicar, y si el papá no entendió algo que el niño entendió desde su visión de niño, el niño se lo va a explicar de su visión”.

La comunicación humana es algo que Tobar enfatiza como base de la filosofía de Teatro Silencio Blanco. En un mundo tan lleno de pantallas como de personas, cree que nos hace falta a todos una comunicación más directa, algo tan sencillo como “un apretón de manos, un gran abrazo, un decir ‘te quiero’ en persona en vez de por WhatsApp”. Este convidio, dice, “es el fin de por qué hacemos todo esto. Es poder convivir humanamente con el espectador y que el espectador, ellos también podrán convivir humanamente entre ellos—se puedan volver a relacionar”.

“Silencio Blanco”, viernes y sábado a las 8:30 pm en el teatro On.Stage Black.box, Miami-Dade County Auditorium, 2901 W. Flager St., Miami; tickets $30; www.ticketmaster.com.

 


Deja un comentario ...
Debe estar registrado
No one logged in. Log in
Deja un comentario ...
Was this helpful?
No Very

Captcha Image